APS News

2019 Fall Prize & Award Recipients

APS announces the Fall 2019 prize and award recipients for outstanding work in the fields of fluid dynamics, nuclear, and plasma physics.

July 12, 2019

Each year, APS receives hundreds of nominations from scholars around the world hoping to recognize a colleague or pupil through the Society’s prizes and awards. The Fall 2019 awards recognized individuals from the United States and abroad in the fields of fluid dynamics and plasma physics. Each award will be presented at an upcoming APS meeting this fall.

Prizes & Awards logo

After reviewing hundreds of nominations, APS selection committees have named the winners of the Fall 2019 prizes and awards. Recipients have been selected for eight prizes and awards for outstanding work in the fields of fluid dynamics, nuclear physics, or plasma physics. Each award will be presented at meetings this fall.

The Fluid Dynamics Prize recognizes outstanding achievement in fluid dynamics research.

“For transformative contributions to the measuring and understanding of wall turbulence in extreme Reynolds and Mach number regimes, for pioneering research on bio-inspired propulsion, and in recognition of exemplary technical leadership, mentoring, and community service.”

Alexander Smits, Princeton University

The Stanley Corrsin Award recognizes a particularly influential contribution to fundamental fluid dynamics.

“For outstanding contributions that elucidate the microscopic basis of the flow properties of suspensions, and their influence on macroscopic flow phenomena.” Jeffrey Morris, Levich Institute, City College of New York

The Stuart Jay Freedman Award in Experimental Nuclear Physics honors an outstanding early career experimentalist in nuclear physics.

“For innovative, wide-ranging experiments that found important manifestations of nuclear neutron-proton short-range correlations.”

Or Hen, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

The James Clerk Maxwell Prize for Plasma Physics recognizes outstanding contributions to plasma physics broadly.

“For pioneering research into the nature of turbulence in space and astrophysical plasmas, which has led to major advances in understanding particle transport, dissipation of turbulent energy, and magnetic reconnection.”

William Matthaeus, University of Delaware

The John Dawson Award for Excellence in Plasma Physics Research focuses specifically on achievements in plasma physics research.

“For innovative experiments that demonstrate turbulent dynamo in the laboratory, establishing laboratory experiments as a component in the study of turbulent magnetized plasmas, and opening a new path to laboratory investigations of other astrophysical processes.”

Dustin Froula, University of Rochester

Gianluca Gregori, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory

Donald Lamb, University of Chicago

Alexander Schekochihin, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory

Petros Tzeferacos, University of Chicago

The Thomas H. Stix Award for Outstanding Early Career Contributions to Plasma Physics Research recognizes contributions to plasma physics research by early career physicists.

“For original and seminal experiments, supported by simulations, on magnetic reconnection, the ion Weibel instability, and shocks in laboratory astrophysics.”

William Fox, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Andreas Acrivos Dissertation Award in Fluid Dynamics

“For the development of a high-fidelity, versatile numerical methodology to simulate flow of deformable blood cells in dense suspension through highly complex geometries, and for providing insights to the physics of blood flow in physiologically realistic microvascular capillary networks.”

Peter Balogh, Rutgers University

The Marshall N. Rosenbluth Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Award goes to a young plasma physicist who has performed original thesis work of outstanding scientific quality and achievement.

“For the development of electron-plasma-based techniques to study two-dimensional vortex dynamics in the presence of strong external flows and for investigation of the stability and self-organization of vortices in strain flows.”

Noah Hurst, University of California, San Diego

For more information on the recipients, please visit the APS Honors webpage.

News Update Archive

View Archive


APS News

Read Current Issue


Recent News Update
ICE Reverses Directive on International Student Visas
US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has rescinded its July 6 Directive that would have forced international students to leave the country if their campus offered online-only classes this fall due to the ongoing pandemic.
APS Files Amicus Brief Opposing ICE’s July 6 Directive on International Student Visas
APS and 16 other scientific societies, including AIP, AAAS, and The Optical Society, have formally pledged their support for the lawsuit brought by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to block US Immigration and Customs Enforcement from canceling visas of international students unable to take in-person classes because of the pandemic.
APS and Max Planck Society Partner on “Read and Publish” Open Access Pilot
On July 7, APS announced a new aspect of its partnership with the Max Planck Society (MPG) in Germany allowing open access publication of research papers in APS journals at no direct cost to MPG researchers.
APS Condemns Recent Rule Change by ICE
The APS leadership expresses its outrage at the recent rule change by ICE to cancel F-1 and M-1 visas for students studying off-campus because of the pandemic emergency.
APS Actions in Response to US Visa Proclamation
On June 22nd, the White House issued a Proclamation that suspends entry of particular non-immigrants into the United States.
APS Leadership Letter Condemning Racism
While systemic racism and racial injustice persist in the US and across the world, we are especially concerned for colleagues of color and their families.