APS News

November 1998 (Volume 7, Number 10)

Centennial: APS Ephemera Wanted/APS Centurions

APS Ephemera Wanted!

To help tell the history of the APS at the upcoming Centennial, the exhibit planning group asks members to ply their memories, go through their files and look into the back of drawers for APS-related ephemera. We are particularly interested in graphic items or objects that would not be in the Society's archives, such as personal photographs, old banquet tickets, handouts from APS meetings during the Vietnam war era, buttons (such as those urging relocation of the 1970 annual meeting in Chicago), and the like. If you have treasures of this kind that you would be willing to lend or donate, please contact Amy Halsted by mail, phone (301) 209-3266 or email halsted@aps.org.

APS Centurions

We would also like to identify and recognize the oldest living APS members, those born in 1899 (Centennial centurions), and members belonging to the APS the longest. These members will be our guests at the black-tie optional Fernbank Museum Gala at the Centennial Meeting. Let us know if you can help identify these hardy members.



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Editor: Barrett H. Ripin

November 1998 (Volume 7, Number 10)

Table of Contents

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Articles in this Issue
Centennial: APS Establishes Travel Grants for Student Centennial Attendance
Centennial: Topical Symposia Arranged for Centennial Meeting
Centennial: APS Ephemera Wanted/APS Centurions
Centennial: Historical Factal
Centennial: A Century of Physics
Centennial: Prominent Physicists CD-ROM
Leo Szilard Lectureship Award is Funded
Physicists To Be Honored at November Meetings
In Brief
Physical Review Focus
Senior Membership
APS Regional Sections Hold Fall Meetings
Inside the Beltway: A Washington Analysis
Letters
The Back Page
Zero Gravity: The Lighter Side of Science