APS News

Members in the Media

“Nobody likes fire ants.”
Daniel Goldman, Georgia Tech, Los Angeles Times, May 20, 2013.

“The sound is like an elephant rumble…. It is way below what humans can hear but it travels long distances.”
John Trostel, Georgia Tech, describing a tornado, The Wall Street Journal, May 21, 2013.

“If crowdsourcing is one more way to almost weaken the regulatory environment, then that might actually have unintended consequences.”
David Kaiser, MIT, on the idea of crowdsourcing science funding, BBCNews.com, May 22, 2013.

“The difficulty is that you need a very lightweight nuclear reactor to get you enough power for it.”
Geoffrey Landis, Glenn Research Center, on using a nuclear reactor to power a rocket ship, The Washington Post, May 30, 2013.

“We said, ‘To heck with electromagnetic, we’re going with electrostatic.’ ”
Richard Post, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, on his development of a new kind of battery using a flywheel, The San Jose Mercury News, June 3, 2013.

“The subject has become very contentious.”
Mark Boslough, Sandia National Laboratories, on a theory that a meteor created a minor ice age 13,000 years ago, The Washington Post, June 3, 2013.

“In the first time cloak paper, they discussed hiding events of a few billionths of a second once in a while. Here, they are talking about being able to hide data 46% of the time. This really suggests that this has gone from a curiosity to something that could be used in optical communications and data processing.”
Greg Gbur, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, on another researcher's paper on “time cloaks,” BBCNews.com, June 5, 2013.

“The reason is simple: I believe I am the best candidate to continue the passionate advocacy for progressive values that Sen. Lautenberg exemplified.”
Rush Holt, announcing his bid for a Senate seat from New Jersey, The Washington Post, June 6, 2013.

“It was amazing to be able to see the complete aria…. For me, uncovering the composition of a genius’ work that had been lost for centuries is as thrilling as trying to uncover one of the big secrets of nature.”
Uwe Bergmann, SLAC, who used X-rays to see the lost sections of Luigi Cherubini’s 18th century opera Medee, The Daily Mail, June 11, 2013.