APS News

Physics Works!

An Interactive Exhibit for Everyone

Physics Works! is divided into four parts - Physics Explores the Wonders of Nature, Physics Saves Lives, Physics Drives Technology, and Physics Looks to the Future - each of which illustrates basic discoveries and principles through a large representational component or hands-on interactive element. It emphasizes the importance of physics in our daily lives. A traveling exhibition, Physics Works! will be at the Don Harrington Discovery Center in Amarillo, Texas, through January 2000 and then move to the Fernbank Museum of Natural History in Atlanta (tentative). For information on booking the exhibit, contact Brian Bonnar: bonnar@aps.org.

Sara Schechner, Curator
David Ehrenstein, Physics Advisor
Edward Finkel, Interactives
Puches Design, Design



A human form sculpture features artificial joints, skin, and transplant devices that draw on materials physics, electronics, and acoustics.
A human form sculpture features artificial joints, skin, and transplant devices that draw on materials physics, electronics, and acoustics.
A laser speckle device demonstrates unique properties of coherent light.
A laser speckle device demonstrates unique properties of coherent light.



High school students take a seat in a giant quantum corral as they explore the atomic world.
High school students take a seat in a giant quantum corral as they explore the atomic world.
Students learn about interactive medical imaging with the thermoscope infrared hand viewer: namely, that all things (even humans!) give off electromagnetic radiation.
Students learn about interactive medical imaging with the thermoscope infrared hand viewer: namely, that all things (even humans!) give off electromagnetic radiation.



The 'crazy' (chaotic) pendulum encourages visitors to pull the pendulum bob and try and predict the unpredictable.
The 'crazy' (chaotic) pendulum encourages visitors to pull the pendulum bob and try and predict the unpredictable.
Physics research drives technology, as illustrated by this giant watch with liquid crystal face. Displayed on its reverse are a number of everyday items made possible through physics research.
Physics research drives technology, as illustrated by this giant watch with liquid crystal face. Displayed on its reverse are a number of everyday items made possible through physics research.
The 'particle pinball' machine gives a hands-on illustration of how scientists learn about objects that cannot be directly seen by bombarding them with particle beams.
The 'particle pinball' machine gives a hands-on illustration of how scientists learn about objects that cannot be directly seen by bombarding them with particle beams.




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Editor: Barrett H. Ripin
Associate Editor: Jennifer Ouellette