Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics

To recognize outstanding publications in the field of mathematical physics. The prize consists of $10,000 and a certificate citing the contributions made by the recipient plus travel expenses to attend the meeting at which the prize is bestowed. It will be presented annually.

Establishment & Support

The prize was established in 1959 by the Heineman Foundation for Research, Educational, Charitable, and Scientific Purposes, Inc., and is administered jointly by the American Physical Society and the American Institute of Physics. Biographical information on Dannie Heineman.

Rules & Eligibility

This prize is awarded solely for valuable published contributions made in the field of mathematical physics with no restrictions placed on a candidate's citizenship or country of residence. "Publication" is defined as either a single paper, a series of papers, a book, or any other communication which can be considered a publication. The prize may be awarded to more than one person on a shared basis when all recipients have contributed to the same accomplishments Nominations are active for three years.

Nomination & Selection Process

Deadline: Friday, July 1, 2016

The nomination package must include:

  • A letter of not more than 5,000 characters evaluating the qualifications of the nominee(s)

In addition, the nomination should include:

  • A biographical sketch.
  • A list of the most important publications.
  • At least two, but not more than four, seconding letters.
  • Up to five reprints or preprints.

There may be additional requirements for particular prizes and awards. Please read the rules carefully.

The online nominations system will open toward the end of 2016. Watch for email and website announcements that the site is open to accept new nominations and update material for continuing nominations.

2017 Selection Committee Members: Nigel Goldenfeld (Chair), Jennifer Chayes (Vice Chair), Sharon Glotzer, David K. Campbell (12/16)

Nomination Guidelines


Serving a diverse and inclusive community of physicists worldwide is a primary goal for APS. Nominations of qualified women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and scientists from outside the United States are especially encouraged.

2016 Recipients

Andrew E. Strominger
Harvard University

Cumrun Vafa
Harvard University



Past Recipients

2015: Pierre Ramond
2014: Gregory W. Moore
2013: Michio Jimbo
          Tetsuji Miwa
2012: Giovanni Jona-Lasinio
2011: Herbert Spohn
2010: Michael Aizenman
2009: Alain Rouet
          Carlo Becchi
          Igor Tyutin
          Raymond Stora
2008: Mitchell Feigenbaum
2007: Joseph Polchinski
          Juan Maldacena
2006: Daniel Freedman
          Peter van Nieuwenhuizen
          Sergio Ferrara
2005: Giorgio Parisi
2004: Gabriele Veneziano
2003: James W. York
          Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat
2002: John H. Schwarz
          Michael B. Green
2001: Vladimir Igorevich Arnol'd
2000: Sidney R. Coleman
1999: Barry M. McCoy
          Tai Tsun Wu, Alexander B. Zamolodchikov
1998: Edward Witten
          Nathan Seiberg
1997: Harry W. Lehmann
1996: Roy J. Glauber
1995: Roman W. Jackiw
1994: Richard L. Arnowitt, Stanley Deser and Charles W. Misner
1993: Martin C. Gutzwiller
1992: Stanley Mandelstam
1991: Thomas C. Spencer, Jurg Frohlich
1990: Yakov Sinai
1989: John S. Bell
1988: Julius Wess, Bruno Zumino
1987: Rodney Baxter
1986: A.M. Polyakov
1985: D.P. Ruelle
1984: R.B. Griffiths
1983: M.D. Kruskal
1982: J.C. Ward
1981: Jeffrey Goldstone
1980: Arthur Michael Jaffe
          James Gilbert Glimm
1979: Gerard T. Hooft
1978: Elliott Lieb
1977: Steven Weinberg
1976: Stephen William Hawking
1975: Ludwig Dmitriyevich Faddeev
1974: Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar
1973: Kenneth G. Wilson
1972: James D. Bjorken
1971: Roger Penrose
1970: Yoichiro Nambu
1969: Arthur Strong Wightman
1968: Sergio Fubini
1967: Gian Carlo Wick
1966: N.N. Bogolubov
1965: Freeman J. Dyson
1964: Tullio Regge
1963: Keith A. Brueckner
1962: Leon Van Hove
1961: Marvin L. Goldberger
1960: Aage Bohr
1959: Murray Gell-Mann