APS Fellowship

Fellowship in the American Physical Society is a great honor. In accordance with the APS Constitution, "there shall be elected to Fellowship only such Members who have contributed to the advancement of physics by independent, original research or who have rendered some other special service to the cause of the sciences". All division members are invited to nominate deserving colleagues as potential Fellows of the APS.
Gray arrow DCOMP Deadline for APS Fellowship Nomination: Monday, June 3, 2019
Gray arrow APS Fellowship Information

APS Fellows Nominated by DCOMP  

Filter by Year:


Albers, Robert C. [2008]
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Citation: For his pioneering work on the theory of f-electron elements and materials, and its implementation of into robust computational methods for use by experimentalists to interpret Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectra.


Allen, Gabrielle D. [2017]
University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign
Citation: For international leadership in development of widely used simulation frameworks for numerical relativity, relativistic astrophysics, and other areas, laying a foundation for many groups to address complex problems in multi-messenger astronomy.


Aluru, N. R. [2017]
University of Illinois at Urbana – Champaign
Citation: For outstanding contributions to the development of multiscale and multiphysics computational techniques and their application to nanofluidics and nano/micro electromechanical systems to accurately predict interfacial phenomena, including the prediction of new properties at nanoscale.


Amar, Jacques [2014]
University of Toledo
Citation: For the development and use of novel computational methods which have advanced our fundamental understanding of a range of problems in condensed matter and statistical physics, including the kinetics of domain growth, surface roughening, crystal growth and thin film deposition.


Ambrosch-Draxl, Claudia [2011]
University of Leoben
Citation: For her seminal contributions to the development and applications of first principle theoretical techniques to the study of spectroscopic properties of condensed systems, and her pioneering work on the ab-initio theory of organic semiconductors.


Anderson, David Vincent [1992]
Affiliation not available
Citation: For valuable contributions to the understanding of plasma equilibria, stability, and nonlinear dynamics through the application of computational models that emphasized realism, accuracy, and efficiency.


Andreoni, Wanda [2005]
IBM Zurich Research Laboratory
Citation: For important contributions to the development and implementation of ab-initio computational methods, and for pioneering investigations that led to deep insights into the behavior of diverse condensed matter, chemical, and biomolecular systems.


Aydemir, Ahmet Yasar [1994]
University of Texas, Austin
Citation: For the development of three-dimensional nonlinear incompressible resistive-MHD simulations and their application to dynamo action in reverse field pinches; and for numerical investigations of the trigger mechanism for fast sawtooth crashes in tokamaks.


Baldridge, Kim K. [2000]
University of California, San Diego
Citation: For her development and application of methods for quantum calculations of molecular structure and reactivity, including her studies of aromaticity which continue the tradition of Maria Goeppert-Mayer.


Barnes, Daniel Charles [1991]
Affiliation not available
Citation: For original contributions to the development of long-time step methods of kinetic plasma calculation and their application to multi-dimensional problems.


Baroni, Stefano [2006]
Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanz
Citation: For his seminal contributions to the broad area of modeling of condensed matter and for his services to the international electronic structure community as a promoter and an instructor.


Barton, Nathan R [2017]
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Citation: For diverse contributions in computational materials science in support of national security interests, especially related to novel state variable descriptions for material response under both static and dynamic conditions.


Bateman, Glenn [2000]
Lehigh University
Citation: For his theoretical and computational research on MHD instabilities and predictive transport modeling of tokamak plasmas, emphasizing detailed comparisons between theory-based simulations and experimental data.


Batrouni, Ghassan [2006]
Institut Non-Lineaire de Nice University of Nic
Citation: For fundamental contributions to quantum monte carlo techniques and their application to lattice gauge theory, condensed matter and atomic physics.


Belonoshko, Anatoly B [2017]
Royal Institute of Technology
Citation: For the development and application of novel computational methods that have led to fundamental insights into behavior of matter at extreme conditions, physics of melting, and the Earth's core.


Benedict, Lorin X. [2018]
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Citation: For the development of first-principles approaches that include electron-hole interaction effects in the prediction of optical absorption in materials, the properties of matter under extreme environments, and the prediction of carbon nanotube properties.


Benioff, Paul [2001]
Argonne National Laboratory
Citation: For highly original work that first showed quantum computation to be theoretically possible and led to important subsequent advances in quantum communication and quantum computing.


Berg, Bernd A. [2004]
Florida State University
Citation: For pioneering lattice gauge theory simulations, innovative contributions to Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms and their applications to Statistical Physics.


Berman, Gennady P. [2002]
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Citation: For his internationally recognized expertise in the areas of classical and quantum dynamical systems, dynamical chaos, dynamics of quantum computation, and modeling of nano-devices.


Bernard, Claude [1998]
Washington University
Citation: For his many contributions to the numerical study of quantum chromodynamics, particularly of the weak decays of strongly interacting particles


Bernstein, Noam [2015]
Naval Research Laboratory
Citation: For pioneering development of multiscale simulations in solids, atomistic simulations of mechanical properties, and the development and application of atomistic methods for structural and finite temperature properties of materials.


Blaisten-Barojas, Estela Olga [2006]
George Mason University
Citation: For pioneering work in the computational simulation of atomic and molecular clusters including significant advances in the understanding of the structure and other important properties of nanoscale systems.


Boettger, Jonathan C. [2012]
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Citation: For diverse contributions of profound impact on modern methods of simulating matter under extreme conditions, especially equations of state and properties of heavy element systems, and for synthesizing the computed results in ways significant to the success of experiments important to national security


Boghosian, Bruce Michael [2000]
Boston University
Citation: For contributions to mathematical and computational fluid dynamics, lattice models of fluids and soft condensed matter, and leadership and service in the field of computational physics.


Bohnen, Klaus [2007]
IFP - Forschungszentrum
Citation: For his ground breaking work in theoretical calculations of the dispersion of surface phonon using ab initio methods.


Boninsegni, Massimo [2007]
University of Alberta
Citation: For the development of a novel methodology enabling accurate, large-scale Quantum Monte Carlo simulations of interacting many-body systems, and for its application to the investigation of the supersolid phase of helium and of superfluidity of molecular hydrogen.


Boon, Jean Pierre [2017]
University Libre de Brussels
Citation: For pioneering insights into the fundamentals of statistical fluid dynamics, which have proven instrumental to the development of many important computational methods in statistical physics, and mesoscale hydrodynamics.


Boronat, Jordi [2014]
Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya
Citation: For his development and implementation of high order imaginary-time propagators in Diffusion and Path-Integral Monte Carlo simulations and for their use for the accurate determination of equation of state of quantum fluids and dilute Fermi gases in various geometries and in the BEC-BCS crossover regime.


Boyer, Larry Lee [1995]
Naval Research Laboratory
Citation: For the formulation, development, and implementation of novel methods of modelling the mechanical and thermodynamic properties of ionic materials.


Broughton, Jeremy Quinton [1997]
Naval Research Laboratory
Citation: For outstanding contributions to large-scale numerical simulations of materials behavior, in both the classical and quantum domains.


Bulatov, Vasily V. [2005]
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Citation: For outstanding contributions to computational materials science, particularly in the areas of dislocation dynamics and crystal plasticity.


Buongiorno-Nardelli, Marco [2010]
North Carolina State University
Citation: For his seminal work on surfaces and interfaces for energy and environment applications, as made possible by his development of novel techniques for the first principle evaluation of the properties of complex and nanostructured materials.


Camp, William J. [1998]
Sandia National Laboratories
Citation: For contributions to computational methods in the theory of phase transition and in reactor safety physics, and for seminal efforts in high performance computing for science and engineering.


Canning, Andrew M. [2014]
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Citation: For his important contributions to the development of parallel and computational algorithms for a diverse range of electronic structure methods and their application to systems ranging from nanostructures, complex magnetic systems to nuclear detection materials.


Catterall, Simon [2016]
Syracuse University
Citation: For numerous important contributions to computational physics and lattice field theory through studies of gravity, technicolor, and especially the lattice formulation of supersymmetric field theories.


Ceperley, David M. [1992]
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Citation: For development of innovative algorithms to deal with quantum many-body problems with their application to significant physical problems.


Chandrasekharan, Shailesh [2018]
Duke University
Citation: For developing new ideas to solve sign problems in strongly correlated massless Dirac fermion systems, and for constructing new fermion Monte Carlo algorithms that have helped to accurately study fermionic quantum critical behavior in 2+1 dimensions and to discover exotic quantum critical points.


Chandross, Michael E. [2012]
Sandia National Laboratories
Citation: For his outstanding contributions to the development of computational physics methods and their application to tribology and the aging and reliability of nanomaterials


Chen, Hudong [1999]
Exa Corporation
Citation: For contributions to fundamental fluid and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence theory, pioneering work in discrete many-body systems and Lattice Boltzmann representations, and industrial applications and practical numerical methods based upon these ideas.


Chen, Shiyi [1995]
IBM T.J. Watson Research Center
Citation: For outstanding research in lattice gas methods involving creative analysis and massive computations at the frontiers of high performance computing; and for contributing fundamental advances in the theory of turbulence.


Chen, Yang [2013]
University of Colorado
Citation: For the development of critically important models and algorithms used in gyrokinetic simulation, including the direct electromagnetic algorithm, the coarse-graining procedure and a rigorous collisional delta-f algorithm.


Cheng, Hai-Ping [2005]
University of Florida
Citation: For insights from pioneering nanoscale simulations, notably on cluster phase transitions,surface melting, and nanocrystal-surface interactions, especially the interplay between structure and dynamics and between structure and conductance.


Chin, Siu Ah [2006]
Texas A & M University
Citation: For original and powerful new fourth-order algorithms to solve diverse computational problems in physics and chemistry; and for pioneering theoretical and computational contributions to the many-body physics of hadronic matter.


Cieplak, Marek [1998]
Polish Academy of Sciences
Citation: For his insightful contributions to the numerical studies of disordered systems.


Cohen, Ronald Elliott [2002]
Carnegie Institute
Citation: For contributions to the understanding of the physics of ferroelectrics, and for developments of methods and understanding of high pressure and temperature materials properties.


Crespi, Vincent [2007]
Pennsylvania State University
Citation: For creative ideas and innovative computations enhancing our understanding of nanoscale matter and predicting new structures and materials with properties possessing technological and/or fundamental scientific value.


Curtarolo, Stefano [2013]
Duke University
Citation: For pioneering automatic high-throughput computational materials science, and for the creation of on-line materials development techniques, the ingredients of the Materials Genome Initiative.


de Gironcoli, Stefano [2011]
SISSA
Citation: For his seminal and far reaching contributions to density-functional perturbation theory, and for his outstanding services to the electronic-structure community, including the creation and distribution of top-class simulation software and the dissemination of knowledge throughout the developed and developing world.


de la Rubia, Tomas Diaz [2002]
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Citation: For his contributions to multi-scale modeling of materials and seminal research on defect processes in solids under irradiation or high strain-rate conditions.


Deans, Stanley Roderick [2000]
University of South Florida
Citation: For helping reveal the beauty and power of the Radon transform.


Decyk, Viktor Konstantyn [1993]
Affiliation not available
Citation: For his pioneering work in the area of plasma simulations including applications of parallel computers to plasma modeling and the use of computers in the teaching of plasma physics.


DeGrand, Thomas Alan [2001]
University of Colorado
Citation: For contributions to our understanding of the strong interactions- particularly for the development of innovative techniques in the numerical study of quantum chromodynamics.


Detar, Carleton Edward [1998]
University of Utah
Citation: For wide ranging contributions to hadronic and computational physics from the MIT bag model, to lattice studies of the spectrum, and especially for study of the quark-gluon plasma.


DeVore, Carl Richard [2000]
Naval Research Laboratory
Citation: For his development of a new class of numerical algorithms for magnetohydrodynamic simulations, their wide dissemination in software, and their applications to physics.


Doolen, Gary Dean [2003]
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Citation: For frontier computational research in fluid dynamics modeling, one-component plasmas, complex-rotation methods for atomic resonances, and laser-plasma interactions.


Duxbury, Philip M. [2006]
Michigan State University
Citation: For the development of efficient computational methods for strongly non-linear disordered systems and the extraction of novel physics from the application of these methods.


Dworzecka, Maria [1996]
George Mason University
Citation: For co-directing the Consortium of Upper Level Physics Software (CUPS) and co-editing accompanying instructional material for upper level physics classes.


Edwards, Robert [2011]
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility
Citation: For developing key theoretical, algorithmic and computational methods to enable Lattice QCD to address vital questions in nuclear physics, and in particular the spectrum of excited states and the origin of the nuclear force.


Elder, Ken [2018]
Oakland University
Citation: For groundbreaking contributions to the field of computational materials physics, his insights into growth phenomena, moving boundary and interface problems, pattern formation and the development of phase field crystal modeling.


Erwin, Steven Charles [2006]
Naval Research Laboratory
Citation: For creative and influential contributions to computational materials science in the fields of fulleride solids, semiconductor surfaces, magnetic semiconductors, and nanocrystals.


Escobedo, Fernando A. [2014]
Cornell University
Citation: For the elucidation and prediction of complex phases formed by block copolymers, elastomers, and colloidal suspensions of anisotropic particles, and the advancement of novel Monte Carlo simulation methods.


Fahy, Stephen Bernard [2005]
Fahy, Stephen Bernard
Citation: For contributions to the development of variational wave function and pseudopotential quantum Monte Carlo methods and the application of electronic structure theory to materials under extreme pressures and photoexcitation.


Feldman, Joseph Louis [2005]
Naval Research Laboratory
Citation: For the formulation and implementation of novel modeling methods for vibrational properties of disordered systems: thermal conductivity of amorphous silicon and localized vibronic Raman spectra of solid hydrogen.


Finn, Lee Samuel [2002]
Pennsylvania State University
Citation: For innovative contributions to the computational infrastructure for gravitational wave detection, detector modeling, data analysis and source simulations.


Foiles, Stephen M. [2000]
Sandia National Laboratories
Citation: For significant advances in the computational simulation of materials including pioneering work on the embedded atom method and demonstrating the power of simulations to determine important properties.


Fong, Ching-Yao [1995]
University of California, Davis
Citation: For pioneering work in developing theoretical models and applying them to computational studies of the fundamental electronic and vibrational properties of semiconductor systems.


Friedman, Alex [1996]
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Citation: For innovations in computer modeling of fusion plasmas, laser-plasma interactions and charged particle beams, and design of high space charge accelerator components.


Fye, Richard Maurice [2006]
Sandia National Laboratories
Citation: For the pioneering development and usage of exact quantum Monte Carlo and other methods for studying models of highly correlated electrons.


Gagliardi, Laura [2016]
University of Minnesota
Citation: For seminal contributions to the development of electronic-structure methods and their application to the understanding of complex chemical systems, including the prediction of new materials and associated properties.


Galli, Giulia [2003]
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Citation: For important contributions to the field of ab initio molecular dynamics and to the understanding of amorphous and liquid semiconductors and quantum systems.


Gardner, John Herbert [1991]
Florida State University
Citation: For extensive and innovative contributions to the numerical simulation of fluid and plasma flows, especially in the area of inertial confinement fusion, and for leadership in the development of numerical simulation techniques.


Germann, Timothy [2011]
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Citation: For fundamental contributions to the application of large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to the study of shock-induced plasticity and phase transitions in metals, as well as applications of these techniques in the development of large-scale agent-based models in computational epidemiology.


Giannozzi, Paolo [2013]
Universita di Udine
Citation: For his seminal contributions to development of density-functional perturbation theory and for his services to the electronic-structure community in open-source software development and in dissemination of knowledge on first-principle simulations throughout the developed and developing world.


Glotzer, Sharon C. [2006]
University of Michigan
Citation: For her pioneering simulations of glass-forming liquids, self-assembled nanomaterials and complex fluids, and for her leadership and service to the computational science community.


Goedeceker, Stefan A. [2008]
University of Basel
Citation: For his pioneering development of efficient linear scaling and low complexity algorithms for electronic structure calculations and atomistic simulations.


Gonis, Antonios [2014]
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Citation: For advancing multiple scattering theory electronic structure methods for metals, alloys and interfaces and for the dissemination of these techniques in condensed matter and materials science.


Gonze, Xavier [2007]
University of Catholique de Louvain
Citation: For contributions to density-functional perturbation theory and its application to dielectric properties, and for leadership in open-source software development for the electronic structure community.


Gottlieb, Steven A. [1994]
Indiana University
Citation: For leadership in large scale computations of hadronic properties, including the calculation of coupling constants, the mass spectrum, and the quark gluon plasma.


Gould, Harvey Allen [1995]
Clark University
Citation: For his work in statistical and computational physics, specifically his studies of clusters and the dynamics of first-order phase transitions, and for his work on introducing computer simulations and computational methods into the undergraduate curriculum and to a wider scientific audience.


Grant, Martin [2015]
McGill University
Citation: For groundbreaking contributions on computational materials physics in systems out of equilibrium and fundamental contributions to nonequilibrium statistical mechanics.


Gronbech-Jensen, Niels [2010]
University of California, Davis
Citation: For his development and application of new computational algorithms and tools in Biological and Condensed Matter Physics, especially those involving massively parallel molecular dynamics, electrostatic interactions, ion implantation, and nonlinear physics.


Grossman, Jeffrey C. [2013]
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Citation: For important contributions to the development and application of Quantum Monte Carlo methods for electronic structure calculations, and the use of first principles methods to predict the properties of materials and nanostructures at the microscopic level.


Gubernatis, James Edward [1993]
Affiliation not available
Citation: For his contributions to the methodology and the application of quantum simulation techniques to interacting electron problems in condensed matter physics.


Guo, Guang-Yu [2005]
National Taiwan University
Citation: For his contributions to our understanding of relativity-induced phenomena in magnetic solids and physical properties of materials including transition metal oxides and carbon nanotube structures, through first-principles electronic structure calculations.


Gupta, Rajan [1994]
Los Alamos Science Laboratory
Citation: For fundamental contributions to numerical simulations in lattice quantum chromodynamics and the Monte Carlo renormalization group.


Gygi, Francois [2010]
University of California, Davis
Citation: For his outstanding contributions to the development of innovative computational algorithms for the accurate and most efficient calculation of the electronic structure of a broad variety of systems, relevant to solid state and liquid structure theory, to nanoscience and chemical physics.


Habib, Salman [2018]
Argonne National Laboratory
Citation: For outstanding contributions and leadership in the study of quantum-to-classical transitions in nonlinear dynamical systems and the development of the Hybrid/Hardware Accelerated Cosmology Code providing the most detailed simulations of the universe using the world's most advanced supercomputers.


Hansmann, Ulrich H. [2008]
Michigan Technological University
Citation: For pioneering protein simulations, innovative contributions to computational algorithms and their applications to Biological Physics.


Harris, Frank E. [2004]
University of Florida
Citation: For innovative contributions, over a 50-year period and still continuing, to methods of electronic structure computation for atoms, molecules, and solids, and to the underlying mathematics.


Hellberg, C. Stephen [2014]
Naval Research Laboratory
Citation: For creative and influential contributions in the fields of strongly correlated materials, quantum dots, defects, and heterostructures.


Herrmann, Hans Jurgen [2006]
University of Stuttgart, Germany
Citation: For his novel contributions to significant problems in computational physics including fracture, packings, percolation, granular flow, dunes and irreversible growth.


Hewett, Dennis W. [1993]
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Citation: For significant contributions to the formulation of implicit plasma simulation methods, to the solution of linear systems, and for many advances in successfully modeling experiments.


Hoeflich, Peter [2012]
Florida State University
Citation: For outstanding contributions to stellar evolution, radiation hydrodynamics, and nuclear astrophysics, especially in the context of modeling the light curves and spectral evolution of supernova explosions


Holmgren, Donald [2011]
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
Citation: For leadership and innovation in the design and operation of massively parallel computers for lattice gauge theory.


Jacoboni, Carlo [1999]
Modena University
Citation: For outstanding research and leadership in computational analysis of transport phenomena in solids.


Jansen, Henri J. F. [2005]
Oregon State University
Citation: For his contributions to the theory and methods of electronic structure calculations, especially for developing precise methods for computing crystalline magnetic anisotropy.


Jarrell, Mark [2007]
University of Cincinnati
Citation: For seminal contributions to the development of computational condensed matter physics including dynamical mean field theory and the dynamical cluster approximation applied to advancing the understanding of strongly correlated electron systems.


Johannes, Michelle D. [2012]
Naval Research Laboratory
Citation: For computational work that has made a strong impact in novel superconductivity, magnetism, charge density waves and battery electrode materials. Her calculations have contributed to understanding and explaining the underlying physics that governs the properties of widely diverse materials


Johnson, Duane Douglas [2003]
University of Illinois
Citation: For theoretical and computational contributions to our understanding of physical properties of disordered alloys which have uncovered the microscopic underpinnings of the thermodynamics and phase transformations of alloys.


Kalia, Rajiv [2007]
University of Southern California
Citation: For contributions to the development of multimillion-atom multiscale simulation methods on parallel computers and their application to the fundamental understanding of atomistic mechanisms for broad properties and processes in nanostructured materials.


Kalos, Malvin H. [1993]
Affiliation not available
Citation: For his seminal work in the development and application of Monte Carlo methods to statistical physics.


Kaski, Kimo [1993]
Affiliation not available
Citation: For contributions to the physics of transport properties, phase transitions, and droplet spreading.


Kent, Paul [2017]
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Citation: For outstanding and diverse application of electronic structure methods in condensed matter and their application, development, and optimization on high performance computers.


Khokhlov, Alexei M. [2002]
Naval Research Laboratory
Citation: For the development of innovative computational techniques and their successful application to critical problems in astrophysics and combustion science.


Koelling, Dale D. [1995]
U.S. Department of Energy
Citation: For seminal contributions to the computational theory of the electronic properties of crystalline materials, especially rare earths and actinides, and for providing direction and leadership to the DoE computational science community.


Krakauer, Henry [1995]
College of William & Mary
Citation: For outstanding accomplishments in formulating and implementing the all-electron description of the electronic structure and related physical properties of complex crystalline solids and their surfaces.


Kress, Joel D [2016]
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Citation: For contributions to computational scattering, materials, and dense plasma simulation techniques.


Kritz, Arnold H. [1998]
Lehigh University
Citation: For the development of innovative simulation tools to study wave heating, current drive and transport in plasmas, and for inspired leadership in a teamed approach to large computations.


Ladd, Anthony [1998]
University of Florida
Citation: For a variety of contributions to numerical simulations of particle systems and especially for the development of lattice-gas and lattice-Boltzmann methods to particle suspension.


Landau, Rubin Harold [1998]
Oregon State University
Citation: For innovative developments and practical applications of computational quantum physics to the scattering and exotic bound states of elementary particles, and for original books in quantum mechanics and computational physics.


Laradji, Mohamed [2014]
University of Memphis
Citation: For his pioneering and seminal contributions to applications of computational techniques in elucidating physics of bio-membranes, complex fluids, and of polymers.


Levine, Michael Jerry [1994]
Carnegie Mellon University
Citation: For significant contribution to the development and application of large-scale symbolic and numerical techniques in quantum electrodynamics, and for his leadership of the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center.


Liewer, Paulett Creyke [1992]
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Citation: For her pioneering work in use of parallel supercomputers for plasma modeling, both development of concurrent algorithms for plasma particle-in-cell codes and application to physical problems, and also past work on transport in tokamaks.


Lin, Hai Qing [2003]
Chinese University of Hong Kong
Citation: For his contributions in developing and applying computational methods to quantum many body systems.


Liu, Amy [2010]
Georgetown University
Citation: For her innovative and influential computational studies of the electronic, structural, and vibrational properties of solids, and of electron-phonon interactions, with applications to ultra-hard materials; high-pressure phases; fullerenes, nanotubes, and related compounds; and novel superconductors.


Lomdahl, Peter Sejersen [1995]
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Citation: For his outstanding work on the development and application of large-scale Langevin and Molecular Dynamics simulation techniques to problems in nonlinear condensed matter physics and materials science.


Long, Lyle [2007]
Pennsylvania State University
Citation: For the advancement and teaching of computational science. In particular, for the use of high performance computers for computational fluid dynamics, aeroacoustics, and rarefied gas dynamics.


Lookman, Turab [2012]
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Citation: For seminal contributions to the computational physics of materials, complex fluids and nonlinear dynamics


Luijten, Erik [2013]
Northwestern University
Citation: For the development of algorithms that greatly accelerate the simulation of condensed-matter systems and for their application in elucidating the behavior of a broad range of self-assembly phenomena.


Manousakis, Efstratios [2002]
Florida State University
Citation: For innovative and original computational studies in the many-body problem including development of novel algorithms to tackle the many-fermion problem with very important applications to condensed-matter physics.


Marzari, Nicola [2014]
Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne
Citation: For the development of creative and original methods for ab initio calculations of materials properties, in particular Wannier-based electronic structure methods and first principles simulations of transport properties of solids and nanostructures.


Matthaeus, William Henry [1998]
University of Delaware
Citation: For contributions to understanding of fluid and plasma relaxation processes, for pioneering work on novel lattice gas simulation methods, and for advances in understanding of turbulence and particle scattering in space plasmas.


Mattsson, Thomas R [2017]
Sandia National Laboratories
Citation: For contributions to the fundamental understanding of condensed matter at extreme temperatures and pressures through molecular dynamics and electronic structure simulations.


Mauri, Francesco [2015]
No Company Provided
Citation: For the development and application of original methods to determine materials properties from first-principles, most notably for the case of solid-state NMR and EPR spectroscopies and electron-phonon interaction and superconductivity.


Mazevet, Stephane [2015]
CNRS
Citation: For fundamental contributions to computational simulations of the properties of matter under extreme density, temperature, and radiation conditions.


Mazin, Igor Ilich [2004]
Naval Research Laboratory
Citation: For contribution to the quantitative theory of materials, including superconducting, magnetic and transport properties, using ab initio computational methods.


McMahan, Andrew K. [2002]
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Citation: For pioneering work on the computation of effective Hamiltonian parameters for superconducting oxides and phase transitions of materials under high pressure, and the subsequent solution of the associated models.


Mehl, Michael John [1999]
Naval Research Laboratory
Citation: For outstanding contributions to the development of density functional theory and to its applications using the LAPW method, tight-binding Hamiltonians and methods based on localized charge densities.


Melott, Adrian Lewis [1996]
University of Kansas
Citation: For groundbreaking studies of the origin and evolution of cosmic structure.


Meunier, Vincent [2011]
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Citation: For advancing the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology through the application of innovative theory and advanced computation for the understanding of energy flow and storage mechanisms in nanostructured materials including carbons and metal oxides.


Michaelides, Angelos [2016]
London Center for Nanotechnology
Citation: For fundamental contributions to computational simulations of solids and surfaces, particularly adsorption problems, most notably water-solid interfaces.


Mihaila, Bogdan [2011]
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Citation: For contributions to the development of accurate numerical methods for the study of nonlinearity in many-body theory with applications to cold-atom, condensed-matter, nuclear, and high-energy physics.


Mitas, Lubos [2010]
North Carolina State University
Citation: For his contributions to the development of quantum Monte Carlo methods, pioneering high-accuracy calculations of atoms, molecules, clusters and solids, analysis of many-body nodes of fermion states and application of pairing wave functions.


Monticello, Donald A. [1994]
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
Citation: For pioneering advances in the three dimensional simulation of large scale magnetohydrodynamic instabilities in toroidal magnetic confinement configurations.


Moriarty, John Alan [2005]
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Citation: For pioneering contributions to the first-principles quantum-based calculation of interatomicforces in d- and f-electron materials, with major impact on high-pressure physics, multiscale modeling and national security.


Nakamura, Kohji [2014]
Mie University
Citation: For his contributions to the development of first-principles methods and their use in elucidating the physics of noncollinear magnetism, magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and external electric field-induced magnetic phenomena at surfaces and interfaces.


Nakano, Aiichiro [2009]
University of Southern California
Citation: For the development and implementation of scalable parallel and distributed algorithms for large-scale atomistic simulations to predict, visualize, and analyze reaction processes for novel nano-mechano-chemical phenomena encompassing diverse spatiotemporal scales.


Narayanan, Rajamani [2009]
Florida International University
Citation: For groundbreaking work on exact chiral symmetry and topology on the lattice and important contributions to the nonperturbative calculation of the running coupling in non-Abelian gauge theories.


Novotny, Mark Alan [2000]
Florida State University
Citation: For original algorithm development and applications of computational statistical mechanics to equilibrium and nonequilibrium problems in condensed-matter physics and materials science.


O'Shea, Brian W. [2016]
Michigan State University
Citation: For outstanding contributions to the study of cosmological structure formation using large-scale supercomputing, and leadership in the development of computational science research and education


Ogut, Serdar [2011]
University of Illinois, Chicago
Citation: For his contributions to understanding and predicting properties of nanostructures and bulk defects, surfaces, and interfaces through the development and application of first principles computational techniques.


Okamoto, Yuko [2010]
Nagoya University
Citation: For his invention of novel and useful computational methodologies for probing the conformational phase space of biomolecules.


Oleynik, Ivan [2015]
University of South Florida
Citation: For the development and application of novel computational methods that have led to fundamental insights into behavior of matter at extreme conditions, molecular electronics, graphene, and spin-dependent tunneling.


Oran, Elaine Surick [1993]
Naval Research Laboratory
Citation: For innovations using cutting edge computers to model and explain important physical mechanisms involving fluid dynamics, chemistry, and nonequilibrium material properties in complex reacting flows ranging from laboratory to astrophysical systems.


Pandey, Ravindra [2014]
Michigan Technological University
Citation: For creative use of advanced computational techniques from materials physics and quantum chemistry to gain insights into nanostructure behaviors, especially for his prescient recognition of the looming importance of such calculations for predicting bio-nano hybrid material properties.


Park, Wonchull [1997]
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
Citation: For his pioneering contributions to resistive magneto-hydrodynamic theory and to computational physics; and for his careful and extensive application and comparison of these calculations with experiments.


Pederson, Mark R. [1999]
Naval Research Laboratory
Citation: For significantly enhancing the density-functional-based predictive capabilities in molecular and cluster physics by unique developments, implementations and applications of novel computational algorithms.


Peterkin, Robert Edwin [2004]
Air Force Research Laboratory
Citation: For visionary research and leadership in developing advanced computational methods in plasma physics and applying them to systems of geometric complexity.


Peters, Michael H. [2001]
Florida State University
Citation: For contributions to the computational physics of aerosols and gas/solids systems and to computational non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of aerosols.


Piekarewicz, Jorge [2005]
Florida State University
Citation: For seminal and sustained research on fundamental nuclear physics problems using novel computational tools, particularly on the nuclear equation of state and its impact on the physics of neutron stars.


Plimpton, Steven J. [2013]
Sandia National Laboratories
Citation: For creating the Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) molecular dynamics package, open-source materials modeling software that has become widely-used by physicists and materials scientist worldwide.


Ram-Mohan, L. Ramdas [1999]
Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Citation: For his development of powerful analytic and computational methods for the investigation of the properties of novel semiconductor heterostructures.


Rapaport, Dennis Chaim [2001]
Bar-Ilan University
Citation: For innovative contributions to applications, methodology and education in the field of molecular dynamics.


Reichhardt, Charles [2011]
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Citation: For seminal work on the dynamics of collectively interacting particles on random or periodic substrates, including superconducting vortices, colloids, electron crystals and Bose-Einstein condensates.


Reining, Lucia [2007]
CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique
Citation: For her fundamental contributions to ab initio computation of spectroscopic properties of solids, employing many-electron Green¿s function and time-dependent density functional approaches.


Resta, Raffaele [2006]
Universita di Trieste, Italy
Citation: For outstanding contributions to the development of theoretical methods for the calculation of dielectric response and electronic polarization and localization in insulators.


Rewoldt, Gregory [1996]
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
Citation: For his authorship of comprehensive codes for linear toroidal eigenmodes with realistic geometry and kinetic effects and his extensive contributions to the understanding of microinstabilities in tokamaks.


Reynolds, Peter James [1995]
Office of Naval Research
Citation: For his pioneering work on combining the renormalization group method with Monte Carlo simulations in the study of statistical problems, for his contributions to quantum Monte Carlo simulations, and for his service to the physics community through his activities as a Program Officer at the Office of Naval Research.


Rhoades, Clifford Edward, Jr. [1992]
Affiliation not available
Citation: For significant contributions to computational physics, and their wide-ranging application, especially establishing an upper bound on neutron star masses, and developing robust algorithms for computing radiation and fluid flow.


Rice, Julia Elizabeth [2001]
IBM Almaden Research Center
Citation: For pioneering the development of efficient algorithms for the analytic derivative method with electron correlation, and for the calculation of frequency dependent polarizabilities with accuracy comparable to experiment.


Rikvold, Per Arne [2001]
Florida State University
Citation: For innovative and significant computational studies in statistical and condensed-matter physics, materials science, and electrochemistry, including development of novel algorithms to study the decay of metastable phases of matter.


Robbins, Mark Owen [1999]
Johns Hopkins University
Citation: For his contributions to our understanding of the molecular origins of friction, lubrication, spreading and adhesion.


Rognlien, Thomas Dale [2004]
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Citation: For seminal contributions to the modeling of tokamak edge plasmas and their interaction with bounding surfaces, and to the understanding of heating and transport in collisional and RF-excited plasmas.


Roland, Christopher M. [2012]
North Carolina State University
Citation: For his fundamental contributions to computational materials physics and statistical mechanics, his insights into the understanding of growth phenomena for complex and nanostructured materials, and his ground breaking work on surfaces and interfaces.


Romero, Aldo H. [2014]
West Virginia University
Citation: For his seminal contributions to open-source electronic structure codes, and the elastic and thermal characterization of semiconductors, metals, and complex nanostructures at ambient and high pressures.


Roskies, Ralph Z. [1993]
Affiliation not available
Citation: For fundamental contributions to theoretical high-energy physics and the promotion of computational physics through the Pittsburgh Supercomputer Center.


Rudd, Robert E. [2014]
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Citation: For seminal contributions to multiscale modeling of materials physics and science in support of national security.


Rundle, John Belting [2004]
University of California
Citation: For innovative research and fundamental discoveries in the physics of driven nonlinear threshold systems, especially earthquake fault systems, revealed by computational simulations coupled with analysis using statistical physics.


Sagui, Celeste [2013]
North Carolina State University
Citation: For her fundamental contributions to the field of computational biophysics and statistical mechanics, her development of algorithms for simulating long-range electrostatic forces and free energies, and her insights into the understanding of biomolecular structure and nanoscale growth phenomena.


Sanchez-Portal, Daniel [2015]
No Company Provided
Citation: For contributions to the development and use of electronic structure methods, especially SIESTA and its time-dependent version, which has enabled the simulation of systems of unprecedented complexity.


Sandvik, Anders [2007]
Boston University
Citation: For contributions to the development of quantum Monte Carlo methods and their applications to problems in quantum magnetism.


Savrasov, Sergej [2012]
University of California, Davis
Citation: For his innovative design and implementation of electronic structure algorithms and software, and for his many contributions to a microscopic understanding of superconductors, magnetic materials, and strongly correlated electron systems.


Scalettar, Richard T. [2004]
University of California
Citation: For pioneering contributions to the development and application of quantum Monte Carlo techniques to study phase transitions and collective states in strongly interacting systems.


Schilfgaarde, van, Mark [2007]
Arizona State University
Citation: For the development of electronic structure methods, in particular in computational magnetism, the first all-electron self-consistent quasiparticle GW method and novel implementations of the linear muffin-tin orbital approach.


Schmidt, Kevin Edward [2001]
Arizona State University
Citation: For his contributions to enhanced high accuracy computational methods and application in the simulation of electronic structure, nuclear matter and quantum fluids.


Schnack, Dalton D., Jr. [1994]
University of Wisconsin
Citation: For the development of innovative algorithms for long timescale magnetohydrodynamic simulation, and for the successful application of these methods to the RFP dynamo and the dynamics of the solar corona.


Schollwoeck, Ulrich Joseph [2006]
Institut fur Theoretische Physik, Germany
Citation: For his contributions to the density matrix renormalization group method and its application to non-equilibrium classical and quantum problems.


Schwegler, Eric R. [2013]
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Citation: For important contributions to the development of linear scaling electronic structure theory, and the use of first-principles methods to examine the properties of aqueous solutions, nanomaterials and matter under extreme conditions.


Seidel, Edward [2007]
Louisiana State University
Citation: For his leadership in the development of collaborative computational frameworks and for contributions in the numerical solution of the Einstein equations of general relativity.


Selloni, Annabella [2008]
Princeton University
Citation: For her pioneering first-principles computational studies of surfaces and interfaces, which made possible the interpretation of complex experiments, and successfully predicted the physical, and chemical properties of broad classes of materials, including materials for photovoltaic applications.


Shan, Xiaowen [2009]
Exa Corporation
Citation: For seminal contributions in the formulation and applications of lattice Boltzmann models for multiphase and complex fluids; and for pioneering Lattice-Boltzmann-method based fluid dynamics algorithms for real-world engineering applications.


Sharpe, Stephen Roger [1992]
University of Washington
Citation: For outstanding contributions to the development and application of advanced computational techniques in particle theory.


Shchur, Lev [2017]
Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics
Citation: For innovative use of computer simulations and the development of superior random number generators for their use in statistical physics.


Shoemaker, Deirdre M. [2013]
Georgia Institute of Technology
Citation: For her leading role in the investigation of dynamical and binary black hole space-times and their observational signatures.


Singh, David Joseph [1997]
Naval Research Laboratory
Citation: For contributions to the understanding of complex materials using first principles calculations and for development of the tools for such calculations.


Sofo, Jorge O. [2013]
Pennsylvania State University
Citation: For contributions to computational discoveries in transport, structural and optical properties of materials, including the prediction of graphane, a hydrogenated form of graphene, the properties of an ideal thermoelectronic material, thermoelectric properties of superlattices, and the development of efficient computer codes to determine the transport and optical properties of solids.


Stevens, Mark J. [2009]
Sandia National Laboratories
Citation: For his outstanding contributions to the development of computational physics methods and their application to statistical mechanics of polyelectrolytes and complex fluids.


Streitz, Frederick [2015]
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Citation: For important contributions to computational condensed matter physics and for leadership in extreme scale computation.


Succi, Sauro Fausto [1999]
IAC-CNR
Citation: For development and application of lattice Boltzmann and other computational methods that successfully marry continuum and statistical mechanical approaches to complex physics problems.


Sumpter, Bobby G. [2014]
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Citation: For outstanding scientific impact and development in computational soft matter and nanoscience through the development and use of principles from computer science and mathematics and the results of theoretical physics and chemistry to facilitate solving materials problems and discovery of new functional materials.


Svistunov, Boris [2008]
University of Massachusetts
Citation: For pioneering contributions to the theory and practice of Monte Carlo simulations for strongly correlated quantum and classical systems, the invention of the worm algorithm and diagrammatic Monte Carlo techniques, and fundamental theoretical results on superfluid phenomena in quantum gases, liquids, and solids.


Terrones, Humberto [2016]
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Citation: For his pioneering work on the introduction of negative Gaussian curvature in graphitic systems, and unifying different kinds of graphenic nanostructures under the concept of curvature, leading to the prediction of new materials and advances in the field of defects engineering in 2-D materials.


Thonhauser, Timo [2017]
Wake Forest University
Citation: For contributions to include van der Waals interactions in density functional theory.


Toussaint, Doug [1997]
University of Arizona
Citation: For innovative and broad ranging contributions to computational physics including the development of special purpose computers, numerical studies of strongly correlated electron systems, and especially quantum chromodynamics.


Troyer, Matthias [2010]
ETH Zurich
Citation: For his scientific accomplishments in the field of computational many-body physics and for leadership offered to the next generation of computational physicists.


Turchi, Patrice E.A. [2018]
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Citation: For outstanding contributions in developing electronic structure methods with application to thermodynamic stability, order-disorder phenomena, and phase transformations for a broad class of materials, and for impact in the areas of computational thermodynamics and alloy design.


Umrigar, Cyrus Jehangir [2005]
Cornell University
Citation: For important contributions to the development of quantum Monte Carlo methods for continuum systems and their application to computing nearly exact density functional quantities.


Valentí, Maria-Roser [2016]
Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universityersität Frankfurt am Main
Citation: For advancing microscopic understanding of correlated materials by combining computational electronic structure methods with many-body techniques.


Vashishta, Priya [1999]
Louisiana State University
Citation: For contributions in computational quantum, classical and statistical mechanical physics.


Verstraete, Matthieu [2016]
University of Liège
Citation: For contributions in computational materials physics, through the development of opensource electronic structure software and novel methods and algorithms for thermal and electrical transport.


Wang, Cai-Zhuang [2014]
Iowa State University
Citation: For significant advances in developing computational methods including tight-binding molecular dynamics for atomistic simulations, genetic algorithm for crystal and interface structure prediction, and Gutzwiller density functional theory for strongly correlated electron systems.


Wang, Jian [2013]
University of Hong Kong
Citation: For his fundamental contributions to quantum transport theory that has led to state-of-the-art computation methods for nanoelectronic device modeling.


Wang, Jian-Sheng [2005]
National University of Singapore
Citation: For outstanding contributions to the development of novel computer simulation algorithms and for their use in the study of phase transitions and critical phenomena.


Wang, Lin-Wang [2006]
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Citation: For his contributions in computational nanoscience, especially for the development of new computational algorithms in electronic structure calculations of large nanostructures.


Wei, Ching-Ming [2011]
Academia Sinica
Citation: For the development and application of theoretical tools for surface structure determination, and for the significant computational work on surface clusters and the quantum size effect in metal thin films.


Wei, Su-Huai [1999]
National Renewable Energy Laboratory
Citation: For contributions to the understanding of electronic structures and stabilities of compounds, alloys, interfaces, superlattices and impurities using first-principles calculations and for development of the methods for such calculations.


Weinert, Michael Theodor Alfred [2002]
University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
Citation: For his seminal contributions to the understanding of the electronic and magnetic properties of surfaces and bulk materials through the application and the development of first-principles methods.


Whaley, K. Birgitta [2002]
University of California, Berkeley
Citation: For her contributions to theoretical understanding of quantum nanoscale phenomena, especially in superfluid helium droplets, and to control of decoherence in quantum information processing.


White, Steven R. [1998]
University of California, Irvine
Citation: For the development of the density matrix renormalization group method which provides a powerful numerical technique for investigating the properties of strongly correlated electron systems.


Wills, John M. [2012]
Los Alamos National Laboratory
Citation: For pioneering contributions to the development of electronic structure theory and methodology, and first-principles understanding of f-electron physics in rare-earth and actinide materials


Wu, Ruqian [2001]
University of California, Irvine
Citation: For contributions to the understanding of magnetic, electronic, mechanical, chemical and optical properties of compounds, alloys, interfaces, thin films and surfaces using first-principles calculations and for development of the methods and codes for such components.


Zhang, Ruiqin [2018]
City University of Hong Kong
Citation: For path-breaking contributions to the development of quantum-mechanical many-body methods as well as modeling and simulation of large electronic systems such as those with nanosurfaces, promoting their applications in the fields of environment, energy, biology and medicine.


Zhang, Shengbai [2001]
National Renewable Energy Laboratory
Citation: For contributions to the understanding of semiconductor defects, impurities, surfaces, interfaces, and high-pressure phases using first-principles calculations.


Zhang, Shiwei [2009]
College of William & Mary
Citation: For pioneering work in algorithmic innovation of quantum Monte Carlo methods and their applications to many fields of fermion physics including condensed matter, quantum chemistry, nuclear physics, and cold-atom research.


Zhang, Xiaoguang [2012]
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Citation: For pioneering work in the development and application of the scattering theory and computational methods to materials studies, in particular to the study of electron transport in magnetic tunnel junctions


Zimmerman, George B. [1996]
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Citation: For his creation, and subsequent development, of the LASNEX simulation code, which has been used extensively to guide the development of the National ICF program from its inception, to this day.