Division of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics

The Division of Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (DAMOP) was founded in 1943, and was the first division of the American Physical Society. Its central focus is fundamental research on atoms, simple molecules, electrons and light, and their interactions. It plays an enabling role underlying many areas of science through the development of methods for the control and manipulation of atoms, molecules, charged particles and light, through precision measurements and calculations of their properties, and through the invention of new ways to generate light with specific properties. Students who graduate with a background in AMO physics acquire a broad range of knowledge and skills that enable them to contribute to many areas of science and technology.


Congratulations to Our Newest APS Fellows

Gray Arrow APS Fellows from DAMOP

Congratulations to New Prize & Award Recipients

2016 Davisson-Germer Prize in Atomic or Surface Physics
Randall G. Hulet, Rice University

2015 Herbert P. Broida Prize
Michael Ashfold, University of Bristol

2015 I.I. Rabi Prize in Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics
Ian Spielman, National Institute of Standards and Technology

2015 Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Research in AMO Physics
Norman Yao, Harvard University

2016 Will Allis Prize for the Study of Ionized Gases
Klaus Bartschat, Drake University

News & Announcements

Gray arrow Future DAMOP Meeting Sites - The DAMOP 2017 Meeting will be coming to Sacramento, CA on June 5-9, 2017. The DAMOP 2018 Meeting will be in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on May 28 to June 1, 2018.

Resources

Gray arrow From the Editors
Gray arrow Conferences and Special Events
Gray arrow Summer Schools, On-line Courses, Education
Gray arrow Funding
Gray arrow Public Affairs

TAMOC

The Theoretical Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics Community (TAMOC) is a forum for communication among AMO theorists and with the AMO community at large within and beyond the American Physical Society’s Division of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics.
Gray arrow More Information