Eugene M. Chudnovsky

City University of New York

Candidate for Member-at-Large

Biosketch

chudnovskyEugene Chudnovsky received his undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral education in Kharkov - Ukraine in 1970s, in a school of theoretical physics built by Lev Landau and his students. The denial by U.S.S.R. of exit visa to Chudnovsky in 1979 had lead to his unemployment for eight years during which he continued to publish in Western physics journals. In 1987 he joined faculty of the Physics Department of Tufts University as a visiting professor. The following year he moved permanently to the City University of New York where he is now a Distinguished Professor of Physics. He is an APS Fellow since 1993. Chudnovsky’s research is in theoretical condensed matter physics, supported by NSF and DOE grants. He has authored and co-authored 180 research articles and 4 books. Since 1988 he held visiting positions at research centers in the U.S., Asia, and Europe and organized a number of international physics meetings. In 1990s Chudnovsky directed national Program for Refugee Scientists that resettled over 100 refugee scientists in the U.S. He has served as Chair of the APS Committee on International Freedom of Scientists (CIFS), Chair of the Committee on Human Rights of Scientists of the New York Academy of Sciences (NYAS), and member of the Board of the Committee of Concerned Scientists (CCS). On behalf of CIFS-APS, NYAS, and CCS he has visited Cuban research centers and worked on the rights of scientists in the U.S., Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. He speaks English, Spanish and Russian.

Candidate Statement

I first learned about APS involvement in International Affairs 30 years ago when I wanted to leave U.S.S.R. for political reasons but, instead, found myself without a job and without access to physics libraries needed to continue my work. My colleagues at the APS promptly subscribed me to major physics journals and firmly stood behind me when my freedom was in danger. After my emigration to the United States in 1987, I served as Director of Program for Refugee Scientists. Many scientists who where assisted by this program achieved prominence in American universities and industries. My work as chair of the APS Committee on International Freedom of Scientists, chair of the Committee on Human Rights of Scientists of the New York Academy of Sciences, and member of the Board of Directors of the Committee of Concerned Scientists made me familiar with problems faced by scientists in various parts of the world. I have worked and acquired friends at many universities and research centers throughout the world, and I have organized a number of international physics meetings. My international connections and experiences may be of use to the FIP. Besides conventional APS international ties and programs, I am interested in promoting greater cooperation with physicists in Arab countries, Africa, Asia, and Latin America. I would like to put my effort in organizing physics meetings in these parts of the world and in developing programs that encourage cooperation in research, exchange of graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and visiting scientists.