Actualization of the Internet of Things

A FIAP Industrial Physics Conference, American Physical Society

Marriott Hotel and Monterey Conference Center, Monterey CA
April 17-19, 2017

The Internet was invented by physicists, emerging from scientists at CERN who needed a means to send information quickly to geographically dispersed team members. The systems that have evolved since then have been labelled equivalently as the internet or cyber-space. The technical advances which enable the physical infrastructure of the internet are all well-known and well-documented and include fiber optics, diode lasers, electro-optical switching, and wireless networking.

But the internet has yet to reach even a fraction of its potential. Even now, 20 years after the internet’s presence became ubiquitous in business and personal spaces, it serves primarily to move information among computers. Interactions with physical objects are starting to happen, and an explosion of possibilities has caught the imagination of scientists, engineers, computer experts, and the general public.

The phrase the Internet of Things, (IoT) is now being used to represent this interconnection of large numbers of physical entities. But if the interactions arise only from those proficient in software and algorithms, then integration of physical entities, whose behaviors are fundamentally analog, will be inefficient and halting at best. Perhaps this is why the IoT has been so slow to materialize.

This conference, the first of its kind, is intended to bring together those technologists with the skill sets to actualize the IoT. As an APS meeting, we certainly intend to bring together physicists who have interest in this area. In addition, we will include experts in robotics, automation, sensors (without limitation on the definition of a sensor), algorithms, and physical actuation. We also welcome the participation of scientists and engineers from across the technological spectrum (EE, ME, AE, etc.) to allow the sort of cross disciplinary conversations and innovation that will be necessary to build the IoT.

The conference features three keynote speakers and five topical sessions. Each session has four or five expert presenters to give an overview of today’s status and tomorrow’s challenges, with emphasis on where the physics community can make an impact. Keynotes and sessions include the following:

Keynotes

  • The Internet of Things Today
  • The Industrial Internet
  • The Internet of Things Tomorrow

Sessions

  • The Big Challenges
  • Sensor Technology and Physics
  • Industrial Sectors
  • Industrial optimization using physics-based models
  • Practical Challenges

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Registration

Deadline: March 25, 2017
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Hotel

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Attractions

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Actualization of the Internet of Things Conference Poster

IOT Poster

Print a copy to inform your colleagues about this event.
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Registration

Full conference: $375
Single day: $250 April 17-18, $125 April 19

Registration includes breakfast and breaks all days, lunch April 17-18, reception on April 18, all program materials, and internet access.

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Deadline for registration: March 25, 2017

Poster Session

In addition to the invited talks, there will be a poster session for contributed talks on any aspect of the IoT. Poster space is limited so we may not be able to accommodate all submissions.

Apply through the APS abstract system if you would like to be considered for a poster presentation. Click on "Submit an Abstract", then select this meeting. LaTeX Format is easier than RTF. Membership in APS is not required.

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Deadline for abstracts: March 25, 2017

Hotel

The Monterey Marriott is the official headquarters of the conference.

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The conference is organized by the Forum on Industrial and Applied Physics (FIAP) of the American Physical Society (APS) and is the first in a series of conferences aimed directly to the industrial physics community. Key contacts are Barbara Jones, IBM Almaden (bajones@us.ibm.com) and Jeff Hunt, Boeing (jeffrey.h.hunt@boeing.com). Please contact them for more information.