APS News

Members in the Media

“I’m thankful that the world gives us puzzles we can solve, but not too easily.”
Frank Wilczek, MIT, on being asked what about physics he’s most thankful for, PBS.org, November 22, 2011.

“Physics is the only piece of magic I’ve ever seen. I’m grateful for real magic.”
Jim Gates, University of Maryland, on being asked what about physics he’s most thankful for, PBS.org, November 22, 2011.

“I’m thankful for the arrow of time, pointing from the past to the future. Without that, every moment would look the same.”
Sean Carroll, Caltech, on being asked what about physics he’s most thankful for, PBS.org, November 22, 2011.

“As the physicist Ron Johnson once said, I’m grateful to quantum mechanics for an interesting life.”
Edward Farhi, MIT, on being asked what about physics he’s most thankful for, PBS.org, November 22, 2011.

“Just another shameless effort to manufacture a false controversy, once again.”
Michael Mann, Pennsylvania State University, on a recently released batch of hacked emails from climate scientists, CBSNews.com, December 2, 2011.

“It’s big enough you can see it…They’re sitting on the table, out in plain view. The laboratory isn’t particularly cold or particularly hot, it’s just your everyday room.”
Ian Walmsley, University of Oxford, on entangling macroscopic diamond samples, FoxNews.com, December 2, 2011.

“When you’re in the middle of your career, you can’t just take time off for those hobbies…Once you’ve retired, you have these bursts of energy for all these things you wanted to do for the last 25 years when you were working. I was just talking to a woman who had just retired. She said, ‘I have so many quilt patterns in my head, I am going to just make them until I die.’” Elaine Gorham, The New York Times, December 7, 2011.

“Much of the progress in accelerators comes out of this kind of basic research.”
Drew Baden, University of Maryland, talking about technologies from particle accelerators, The Washington Post, December 13, 2011.

“What’s most important is that the way we are looking for the Higgs and the way the LHC is looking, are really very different. If one accelerator sees it and one does not, it might be even more exciting.”
Dmitri Denisov, Fermilab, Chicago Sun-Times, December 13, 2011.

“Occasionally a theorist says that the biggest discovery would be if we don’t find it because that would mean that everything we did up to now is wrong…I think it would be great to find the Higgs boson and understand its properties.”
Robert Cousins, UCLA, The Los Angeles Times, December 13, 2011.

“Black holes give off pairs of Higgs bosons, among many other things…They produce these Higgs particles at their horizons, and if you put a detector there, you would see them. But the detector would be gobbled up pretty quick by the black hole.”
John Gunion, University of California, Davis, MSNBC.com, December 14, 2011.

“Our group and its partners are showing how massive amounts of data will be handled and transported in the future.”
Harvey Newman, Caltech, on breaking the record for fastest data transfer, BBC.com, December 14, 2011.

“It’s an awful name…It does not convey the particle’s true role, that it is the last missing piece of the Standard Model, and that it gives mass to the other particles.”
Michio Kaku, City College of New York, on the Higgs Boson’s “God Particle” moniker, FoxNews.com, December 15, 2011.


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