APS News

Members in the Media

"Until we have independent studies that converge on a single answer, the doubters will prevail, and the fine structure constant will continue to be regarded as well, constant."
–Stephen Maran, American Astronomical Society, on the possibility that the fine structure constant has changed over time, San Francisco Chronicle, May 9, 2005

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"We take biodegradable vegetable matter–paper, twigs, sawdust, waste from bakeries, cafeterias and flower shops and supermarkets–grind it up in water with a little acid and heat, and on the other end we get a product we can sell to industry or turn into P-Series fuel."
–Stephen Paul, Princeton University, on his garbage-based fuel,
the Palm Beach Post, May 8, 2005

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"It has a very smooth ride. When the electric engine is on, it’s completely silent. And the turning radius also is very good."
–Olivier Gayou, Jefferson Lab, on his car, a Toyota Prius, the Virginian-Pilot, May 12, 2005

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"I’m not absolutely sure that hydrogen will ever be exactly the same as gasoline. People might have to relax a little bit and refuel a little more often to save the planet."
–Anne Dillon, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, on hydrogen power, Wired, May 16, 2005

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"The great thing about being in a male-dominated field is that when you go to a conference, there’s no waiting line at the ladies’ room."
–Frances Hellman, UC Berkeley, on being a woman in physics, San Francisco Chronicle, May 17, 2005

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"The issue isn’t: Do you support nuclear? The issue should be: Do you support massive subsidies to the tune of billions of dollars for nuclear power? The answer is no."
–Thomas Cochran, Natural Resources Defense Council, on proposed subsidies for nuclear power, The New York Times, May 15, 2005

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"The signature of Bose-Einstein condensation in those images could not be more clear. It’s very unambiguous. As a scientist, you live to see those kinds of things."
–Randall Hulet, Rice University, Rocky Mountain News, May 28, 2005

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"It was an expedient attempt to solve a problem. What they got is ineffective, wasteful and expensive to maintain."
–Philip J. Wyatt, on the monitoring equipment for biological weapons that was installed in some cities in a hurry after the start of the Iraq war, The New York Times, May 8, 2005

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Massive particles such as protons are built of quarks and gluons, which have zero mass (unless they are moving). Mass is far from conserved."
–Frank Wilczek, MIT, giving examples of things taught in basic physics classes that aren’t exactly correct, such as conservation of mass, The Wall Street Journal, June 3, 2005


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Editor: Alan Chodos
Associate Editor: Jennifer Ouellette
Staff Writer: Ernie Tretkoff