APS News

Physics Students Make Strong Showing at 2001 ISEF

Gene Meieran (extreme left), Intel Fellow and judge, and Carlene Ellis (extreme right), Intel Vice President of Education, with the winners of the $50,000 Intel Young Scientist Scholarship. From left to right: Francis Boulva, Monica Paroder and Ryan Patterson.
Gene Meieran (extreme left), Intel Fellow and judge, and Carlene Ellis (extreme right), Intel Vice President of Education, with the winners of the $50,000 Intel Young Scientist Scholarship. From left to right: Francis Boulva, Monica Paroder and Ryan Patterson.

Physics students were among those taking top honors at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), held in May in San Jose, California. The world's largest pre-college science competition, this year's ISEF recognized more than 800 high school students for their scientific achievements. More than 1,200 students from 38 countries competed for $3 million in scholarships and prizes. The students were judged on their creative ability and scientific thought, as well as the thoroughness, skill and clarity shown in their projects. The APS is a participant in this event, cosponsoring 3 awards with the American Association of Physics Teachers.

The grand prize, the $50,000 Intel Young Scientist Scholarship, was awarded to three students, including Francis Boulva, 18, from Montréal, Québec, Canada, who was recognized for his project, "Galactic Champagne," which demonstrated for the first time that hydrogen bubbles are associated with a particular type of star. His co-recipients were Ryan Patterson, 17, from Grand Junction, Colorado, for a creating a way to electronically translate the American sign language alphabet using a modified golf glove; and Monika Paroder, 17, from Brooklyn, New York, for her two-year study of the protein that catalyzes the transport of iodide into the thyroid and other tissues. Paroder's work could lead to a new approach to diagnosing gastric cancer.

Ryan Patterson, 17, of Grand Junction, Colorado, demonstrates his sign language translator. Patterson won a $50,000 college scholarship at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair.(Photos courtesy of Intel).
Ryan Patterson, 17, of Grand Junction, Colorado, demonstrates his sign language translator. Patterson won a $50,000 college scholarship at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. (Photos courtesy of Intel).

Physics student Mariangele Lisanti, 17, from Westport, Connecticut, won the Glenn T. Seaborg Award for her project entitled, "Conductance Quantization in Gold Nanocontact", which focused on the use of single atoms or molecules to fabricate electronic devices. She and Patterson, her co-recipient for the award, will travel to the Nobel Prize Ceremony in Stockholm, Sweden, in December. Lisanti also won the $5000 prize for best project in her category of physics.

The Intel ISEF has been coordinated for the past 52 years by Science Service, a non-profit organization dedicated to advancing the understanding and appreciation of science among people of all ages through publications and educational programs. Each year a volunteer host committee representing the host city raises funds to sponsor events throughout the fair. For more information on Science Service and the Intel ISEF, see http://www.sciserv.org. Intel's sponsorship of ISEF is part of the Intel Innovation in Education initiative, a global, multimillion dollar effort to help realize the possibilities of science and technology in education. The goal is to prepare today's teachers and students for tomorrow's demands. Intel develops and supports education programs that help meet the needs of students and communities worldwide through improving science, math, engineering and technology education; improving education through the effective use of technology in classrooms; and broadening access to technology and technical careers.



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