APS News

APS Elementary Institute was a Blizzard of Activity

tsawork2From January 7 through January 11 in Washington, DC, 29 scientists from selected sites around the country participated in the second Elementary Science Education Reform Institute. The meeting, a component of the APS Teacher-Scientist Alliance Institute, was designed to provide a thorough overview of issues in school district reform of elementary science education .

Originally almost 40 participants were expected to attend, along with nationally recognized experts in education who would be the presenters. However, an uninvited guest, the Blizzard of '96, reduced the final count of participants and made it impossible for many of the presenters to come. Despite these difficulties, there were enough resources at hand to reprogram the meeting and carry out a very successful institute.

Participants had the opportunity to identify goals for elementary science education, and identify the kinds of experiences that children need in order to realize those goals by participating in hands-on activities. They also examined nationally produced exemplary curriculum materials that should be at the heart of a reform effort. Yet having good materials is not enough. Participants learned about the other structural elements school districts must create in order to support and sustain good hands-on science education. They also examined the process of change in school systems and the role they might play to assist and facilitate reform. It was a very busy week.

These participants returned to their communities better informed and ready to assist ongoing reform efforts. The excitement was palpable as many felt that they really had a handle on how to make a real difference for children. For improving the ability of children to succeed in a scientific and technological world is the real mission of effective science education. From January 7 through January 11 in Washington, DC, 29 scientists from selected sites around the country participated in the second Elementary Science Education Reform Institute. The meeting, a component of the APS Teacher-Scientist Alliance Institute, was designed to provide a thorough overview of issues in school district reform of elementary science education

Originally almost 40 participants were expected to attend, along with nationally recognized experts in education who would be the presenters. However, an uninvited guest, the Blizzard of '96, reduced the final count of participants and made it impossible for many of the presenters to come. Despite these difficulties, there were enough resources at hand to reprogram the meeting and carry out a very successful institute.

Participants had the opportunity to identify goals for elementary science education, and identify the kinds of experiences that children need in order to realize those goals by participating in hands-on activities. They also examined nationally produced exemplary curriculum materials that should be at the heart of a reform effort. Yet having good materials is not enough. Participants learned about the other structural elements school districts must create in order to support and sustain good hands-on science education. They also examined the process of change in school systems and the role they might play to assist and facilitate reform. It was a very busy week.

These participants returned to their communities better informed and ready to assist ongoing reform efforts. The excitement was palpable as many felt that they really had a handle on how to make a real difference for children. For improving the ability of children to succeed in a scientific and technological world is the real mission of effective science education. From January 7 through January 11 in Washington, DC, 29 scientists from selected sites around the country participated in the second Elementary Science Education Reform Institute. The meeting, a component of the APS Teacher-Scientist Alliance Institute, was designed to provide a thorough overview of issues in school district reform of elementary science education

Originally almost 40 participants were expected to attend, along with nationally recognized experts in education who would be the presenters. However, an uninvited guest, the Blizzard of '96, reduced the final count of participants and made it impossible for many of the presenters to come. Despite these difficulties, there were enough resources at hand to reprogram the meeting and carry out a very successful institute.

Participants had the opportunity to identify goals for elementary science education, and identify the kinds of experiences that children need in order to realize those goals by participating in hands-on activities. They also examined nationally produced exemplary curriculum materials that should be at the heart of a reform effort. Yet having good materials is not enough. Participants learned about the other structural elements school districts must create in order to support and sustain good hands-on science education. They also examined the process of change in school systems and the role they might play to assist and facilitate reform. It was a very busy week.

These participants returned to their communities better informed and ready to assist ongoing reform efforts. The excitement was palpable as many felt that they really had a handle on how to make a real difference for children. For improving the ability of children to succeed in a scientific and technological world is the real mission of effective science education. Originally almost 40 participants were expected to attend, along with nationally recognized experts in education who would be the presenters. However, an uninvited guest, the Blizzard of '96, reduced the final count of participants and made it impossible for many of the presenters to come. Despite these difficulties, there were enough resources at hand to reprogram the meeting and carry out a very successful institute.

Participants had the opportunity to identify goals for elementary science education, and identify the kinds of experiences that children need in order to realize those goals by participating in hands-on activities. They also examined nationally produced exemplary curriculum materials that should be at the heart of a reform effort. Yet having good materials is not enough. Participants learned about the other structural elements school districts must create in order to support and sustain good hands-on science education. They also examined the process of change in school systems and the role they might play to assist and facilitate reform. It was a very busy week.

These participants returned to their communities better informed and ready to assist ongoing reform efforts. The excitement was palpable as many felt that they really had a handle on how to make a real difference for children. For improving the ability of children to succeed in a scientific and technological world is the real mission of effective science education. From January 7 through January 11 in Washington, DC, 29 scientists from selected sites around the country participated in the second Elementary Science Education Reform Institute. The meeting, a component of the APS Teacher-Scientist Alliance Institute, was designed to provide a thorough overview of issues in school district reform of elementary science education




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Editor: Barrett H. Ripin