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Preparations Are Well Underway for Centenary Celebration in 1999

By Brian Schwartz, Chair, APS Centenary Planning Committee

The APS is having a party and everyone is invited.

In 1999, the Society will celebrate its Centenary Year, having been founded in New York City on 20 May 1899 at Columbia University. Preparations are well underway for the formal celebration, which will take place in Atlanta, Georgia, in conjunction with a combined March and April Meeting, 20-26 March 1999. All APS members and units are invited to contribute and participate in the celebration. Those APS units that hold their own (or secondary) meetings separately may continue to do so, and have agreed to make a special effort to plan a significant program and encourage their members to attend the general meeting and celebration.

A task force was appointed in 1993, chaired by Mildred Dresselhaus (MIT), with the assistance of APS Treasurer Harry Lustig, to prepare a report on how the APS should celebrate the Society's centenary. The report was presented to the APS Executive Board, Council and units for comments and improvements. After considerable discussion, it was agreed that the major celebration would combine the 1999 March and April meetings in Atlanta, and that the pomp and circumstance of the Centenary Celebration would begin on the weekend prior to the usual five- weekday general and scientific meeting. In addition, the program and celebration would be international in character, involving the leadership of physics and the science policy community around the world, and the Society will develop and implement strategies to widely disseminate the history and accomplishments of physics and the APS over the past 100 years. A Centenary Planning Committee was appointed last year to handle the details, with myself as chair.

The celebration in Atlanta, although not yet finalized, will include one weekend day devoted to a symposium on the international nature and economic importance of physics. This will be followed by a banquet including the leadership and members of physical societies throughout the world. A second weekend date will feature attending Nobel laureates discussing personal moments of discovery which affected their careers. This will be followed by a gala event at the local science museum. In addition, there will be a plenary two-hour session celebrating the accomplishments of physics in the 20th century on Monday and Tuesday of the general meeting. Individual APS units will celebrate the accomplishments within their own fields with symposia and other events.

For those unable to attend the week-long celebration in Atlanta, two major outreach programs are being planned for the Centenary Year. In collaboration with APS units, the Society will prepare a Centenary Speakers Bureau booklet for distribution to educational, governmental and industrial institutions encouraging the recipients to schedule one or more colloquia or seminars. The topics would include the historical, societal, scientific and technological accomplishments of physics in the 20th century. A second planned major project is the development of an attractive illustrated and annotated "time line" wall chart depicting the impact of physics, physicists and technology on the culture and development of the 20th century.

To have a successful Centenary celebration, the APS will need the input, participation and talents of all its members and subunits. The Society has developed an interactive Centenary page on its World Wide Web site. To keep up with the planning and to make suggestions or volunteer, please access the APS Centenary Web page.

Preparations Are Well Underway for Centenary Celebration in 1999
by Brian Schwartz, Chair, APS Centenary Planning Committee

The APS is having a party and everyone is invited.

In 1999, the Society will celebrate its Centenary Year, having been founded in New York City on 20 May 1899 at Columbia University. Preparations are well underway for the formal celebration, which will take place in Atlanta, Georgia, in conjunction with a combined March and April Meeting, 20-26 March 1999. All APS members and units are invited to contribute and participate in the celebration. Those APS units that hold their own (or secondary) meetings separately may continue to do so, and have agreed to make a special effort to plan a significant program and encourage their members to attend the general meeting and celebration.

A task force was appointed in 1993, chaired by Mildred Dresselhaus (MIT), with the assistance of APS Treasurer Harry Lustig, to prepare a report on how the APS should celebrate the Society's centenary. The report was presented to the APS Executive Board, Council and units for comments and improvements. After considerable discussion, it was agreed that the major celebration would combine the 1999 March and April meetings in Atlanta, and that the pomp and circumstance of the Centenary Celebration would begin on the weekend prior to the usual five- weekday general and scientific meeting. In addition, the program and celebration would be international in character, involving the leadership of physics and the science policy community around the world, and the Society will develop and implement strategies to widely disseminate the history and accomplishments of physics and the APS over the past 100 years. A Centenary Planning Committee was appointed last year to handle the details, with myself as chair.

The celebration in Atlanta, although not yet finalized, will include one weekend day devoted to a symposium on the international nature and economic importance of physics. This will be followed by a banquet including the leadership and members of physical societies throughout the world. A second weekend date will feature attending Nobel laureates discussing personal moments of discovery which affected their careers. This will be followed by a gala event at the local science museum. In addition, there will be a plenary two-hour session celebrating the accomplishments of physics in the 20th century on Monday and Tuesday of the general meeting. Individual APS units will celebrate the accomplishments within their own fields with symposia and other events.

For those unable to attend the week-long celebration in Atlanta, two major outreach programs are being planned for the Centenary Year. In collaboration with APS units, the Society will prepare a Centenary Speakers Bureau booklet for distribution to educational, governmental and industrial institutions encouraging the recipients to schedule one or more colloquia or seminars. The topics would include the historical, societal, scientific and technological accomplishments of physics in the 20th century. A second planned major project is the development of an attractive illustrated and annotated "time line" wall chart depicting the impact of physics, physicists and technology on the culture and development of the 20th century.

To have a successful Centenary celebration, the APS will need the input, participation and talents of all its members and subunits. The Society has developed an interactive Centenary page on its World Wide Web site. To keep up with the planning and to make suggestions or volunteer, please access the APS Centenary Web page at http://www.aps.org/centenary.

Preparations Are Well Underway for Centenary Celebration in 1999
by Brian Schwartz, Chair, APS Centenary Planning Committee

The APS is having a party and everyone is invited.

In 1999, the Society will celebrate its Centenary Year, having been founded in New York City on 20 May 1899 at Columbia University. Preparations are well underway for the formal celebration, which will take place in Atlanta, Georgia, in conjunction with a combined March and April Meeting, 20-26 March 1999. All APS members and units are invited to contribute and participate in the celebration. Those APS units that hold their own (or secondary) meetings separately may continue to do so, and have agreed to make a special effort to plan a significant program and encourage their members to attend the general meeting and celebration.

A task force was appointed in 1993, chaired by Mildred Dresselhaus (MIT), with the assistance of APS Treasurer Harry Lustig, to prepare a report on how the APS should celebrate the Society's centenary. The report was presented to the APS Executive Board, Council and units for comments and improvements. After considerable discussion, it was agreed that the major celebration would combine the 1999 March and April meetings in Atlanta, and that the pomp and circumstance of the Centenary Celebration would begin on the weekend prior to the usual five- weekday general and scientific meeting. In addition, the program and celebration would be international in character, involving the leadership of physics and the science policy community around the world, and the Society will develop and implement strategies to widely disseminate the history and accomplishments of physics and the APS over the past 100 years. A Centenary Planning Committee was appointed last year to handle the details, with myself as chair.

The celebration in Atlanta, although not yet finalized, will include one weekend day devoted to a symposium on the international nature and economic importance of physics. This will be followed by a banquet including the leadership and members of physical societies throughout the world. A second weekend date will feature attending Nobel laureates discussing personal moments of discovery which affected their careers. This will be followed by a gala event at the local science museum. In addition, there will be a plenary two-hour session celebrating the accomplishments of physics in the 20th century on Monday and Tuesday of the general meeting. Individual APS units will celebrate the accomplishments within their own fields with symposia and other events.

For those unable to attend the week-long celebration in Atlanta, two major outreach programs are being planned for the Centenary Year. In collaboration with APS units, the Society will prepare a Centenary Speakers Bureau booklet for distribution to educational, governmental and industrial institutions encouraging the recipients to schedule one or more colloquia or seminars. The topics would include the historical, societal, scientific and technological accomplishments of physics in the 20th century. A second planned major project is the development of an attractive illustrated and annotated "time line" wall chart depicting the impact of physics, physicists and technology on the culture and development of the 20th century.

To have a successful Centenary celebration, the APS will need the input, participation and talents of all its members and subunits. The Society has developed an interactive Centenary page on its World Wide Web site. To keep up with the planning and to make suggestions or volunteer, please access the APS Centenary Web page at http://www.aps.org/centenary.

Preparations Are Well Underway for Centenary Celebration in 1999
by Brian Schwartz, Chair, APS Centenary Planning Committee

The APS is having a party and everyone is invited.

In 1999, the Society will celebrate its Centenary Year, having been founded in New York City on 20 May 1899 at Columbia University. Preparations are well underway for the formal celebration, which will take place in Atlanta, Georgia, in conjunction with a combined March and April Meeting, 20-26 March 1999. All APS members and units are invited to contribute and participate in the celebration. Those APS units that hold their own (or secondary) meetings separately may continue to do so, and have agreed to make a special effort to plan a significant program and encourage their members to attend the general meeting and celebration.

A task force was appointed in 1993, chaired by Mildred Dresselhaus (MIT), with the assistance of APS Treasurer Harry Lustig, to prepare a report on how the APS should celebrate the Society's centenary. The report was presented to the APS Executive Board, Council and units for comments and improvements. After considerable discussion, it was agreed that the major celebration would combine the 1999 March and April meetings in Atlanta, and that the pomp and circumstance of the Centenary Celebration would begin on the weekend prior to the usual five- weekday general and scientific meeting. In addition, the program and celebration would be international in character, involving the leadership of physics and the science policy community around the world, and the Society will develop and implement strategies to widely disseminate the history and accomplishments of physics and the APS over the past 100 years. A Centenary Planning Committee was appointed last year to handle the details, with myself as chair.

The celebration in Atlanta, although not yet finalized, will include one weekend day devoted to a symposium on the international nature and economic importance of physics. This will be followed by a banquet including the leadership and members of physical societies throughout the world. A second weekend date will feature attending Nobel laureates discussing personal moments of discovery which affected their careers. This will be followed by a gala event at the local science museum. In addition, there will be a plenary two-hour session celebrating the accomplishments of physics in the 20th century on Monday and Tuesday of the general meeting. Individual APS units will celebrate the accomplishments within their own fields with symposia and other events.

For those unable to attend the week-long celebration in Atlanta, two major outreach programs are being planned for the Centenary Year. In collaboration with APS units, the Society will prepare a Centenary Speakers Bureau booklet for distribution to educational, governmental and industrial institutions encouraging the recipients to schedule one or more colloquia or seminars. The topics would include the historical, societal, scientific and technological accomplishments of physics in the 20th century. A second planned major project is the development of an attractive illustrated and annotated "time line" wall chart depicting the impact of physics, physicists and technology on the culture and development of the 20th century.

To have a successful Centenary celebration, the APS will need the input, participation and talents of all its members and subunits. The Society has developed an interactive Centenary page on its World Wide Web site. To keep up with the planning and to make suggestions or volunteer, please access the APS Centenary Web page.

Preparations Are Well Underway for Centenary Celebration in 1999
by Brian Schwartz, Chair, APS Centenary Planning Committee

The APS is having a party and everyone is invited.

In 1999, the Society will celebrate its Centenary Year, having been founded in New York City on 20 May 1899 at Columbia University. Preparations are well underway for the formal celebration, which will take place in Atlanta, Georgia, in conjunction with a combined March and April Meeting, 20-26 March 1999. All APS members and units are invited to contribute and participate in the celebration. Those APS units that hold their own (or secondary) meetings separately may continue to do so, and have agreed to make a special effort to plan a significant program and encourage their members to attend the general meeting and celebration.

A task force was appointed in 1993, chaired by Mildred Dresselhaus (MIT), with the assistance of APS Treasurer Harry Lustig, to prepare a report on how the APS should celebrate the Society's centenary. The report was presented to the APS Executive Board, Council and units for comments and improvements. After considerable discussion, it was agreed that the major celebration would combine the 1999 March and April meetings in Atlanta, and that the pomp and circumstance of the Centenary Celebration would begin on the weekend prior to the usual five- weekday general and scientific meeting. In addition, the program and celebration would be international in character, involving the leadership of physics and the science policy community around the world, and the Society will develop and implement strategies to widely disseminate the history and accomplishments of physics and the APS over the past 100 years. A Centenary Planning Committee was appointed last year to handle the details, with myself as chair.

The celebration in Atlanta, although not yet finalized, will include one weekend day devoted to a symposium on the international nature and economic importance of physics. This will be followed by a banquet including the leadership and members of physical societies throughout the world. A second weekend date will feature attending Nobel laureates discussing personal moments of discovery which affected their careers. This will be followed by a gala event at the local science museum. In addition, there will be a plenary two-hour session celebrating the accomplishments of physics in the 20th century on Monday and Tuesday of the general meeting. Individual APS units will celebrate the accomplishments within their own fields with symposia and other events.

For those unable to attend the week-long celebration in Atlanta, two major outreach programs are being planned for the Centenary Year. In collaboration with APS units, the Society will prepare a Centenary Speakers Bureau booklet for distribution to educational, governmental and industrial institutions encouraging the recipients to schedule one or more colloquia or seminars. The topics would include the historical, societal, scientific and technological accomplishments of physics in the 20th century. A second planned major project is the development of an attractive illustrated and annotated "time line" wall chart depicting the impact of physics, physicists and technology on the culture and development of the 20th century.

To have a successful Centenary celebration, the APS will need the input, participation and talents of all its members and subunits. The Society has developed an interactive Centenary page on its World Wide Web site. To keep up with the planning and to make suggestions or volunteer, please access the APS Centenary Web page.


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Editor: Barrett H. Ripin