APS News

Special Programming Planned for 1996 March and Spring Meetings

1996 March General Meeting- St. Louis, MO
Job Market, Science Policy Featured

On 1 December 1995, the deadline for the 1996 March Meeting arrived, and along with it, some 4,400 contributed papers. Together with the over 500 invited presentations that had previously been decided on, this turnout promises to make the 1996 March Meeting one of the largest ever. The meeting will take place at the Cervantes Convention Center in St. Louis, which, fortunately, can house the entire program under one roof. (This has not always been the case).

Over 86 percent of the contributed abstracts came in via the new electronic abstract submission process, demonstrating clearly that such a method of submitting papers to meetings was long overdue. For a look at the complete program, go to the APS Home Page, under Meeting Programs.

Along with the traditional technical programs made up of the contributed papers and invited symposia, there will be a number of sessions devoted to non-technical topics, and less formal presentations. On Monday morning, 18 March, the Forum on Physics and Society and the Forum on Education will be presenting a panel and open forum on "Science Policy in an Era of Political Change", which will feature speakers from the political arena. Along similar lines, the Forum on International Physics has a session entitled "The Changing International Environment for Science" on Tuesday morning, 19 March.

There will be several sessions concerning the current job market in physics. On Sunday evening, 17 March, the Forum on Physics and Society will be jointly sponsoring a session with the Forum on Education and the Forum on Industrial and Applied Physics, entitled, "Jobs and Education: A Progress Report and Open Forum." On Monday, 18 March, the Forum on Education (FED) will be sponsoring a symposium entitled "Beating Today's Job Market." As always, the APS will be running a career placement service at the registration desk, with the assistance of the American Institute of Physics' Career Services Division. APS has also arranged a free career workshop run by AIP on Sunday, 17 March.

The Committee on the Status of Women in Physics and the Committee on Minorities in Physics has joined FPS in putting together a session entitled "Minorities and Women in Physics: Current Status and Issues," on Tuesday, 19 March. The centennial of Becquerel's discovery of radioactivity occurs in 1996, and in that vein, the Forum on History of Physics will be presenting a session on the history of radioactivity.

There will be the usual trappings of the largest physics meeting in the world. The opening reception will be held Monday evening, after the ceremonial session. A number of APS prizes and awards will be presented at the meeting. There will be two evening poster sessions, with some food and beverage supplied. The exhibit will open on Tuesday, with over 125 exhibitors of equipment and books. Over 5,000 physicists are expected to attend. For more information, please consult the APS Home Page, or the APS Meeting News insert in this issue.


1996 May APS/AAPT Meeting - Indianapolis, IN
High Level Unified Physics Featured in Indianapolis

The Joint Meeting of the APS and the American Association of Physics Teachers will be held in Indianapolis, 2-5 May 1996. Planners anticipate the highest attendance at this meeting in many years, due not only to its central location and weekend schedule, but to changes in the program structure and a list of very impressive speakers.

Martin Perl (1995 Nobel Prize winner) will be speaking at the meeting. Kip Thorne, the 1995 Julius E. Lilienfeld Prize recipient will be delivering a talk at the Unity of Physics session on Friday, 3 May, as will Carl Wieman, who will be talking about recent results in Bose-Einstein condensation.

Part of the mission of the meeting is to emphasize the unity of the discipline of physics. Toward that end, on Thursday evening, there will be a special tri-divisional colloquium, organized by the Divisions of Nuclear Physics (DNP), Astrophysics (DAP), and Particles and Fields (DPF), entitled "Shadows of Creation: Dark Matter in the Universe" (see IN BRIEF). On Friday, the Unity of Physics session will also feature the retiring APS Presidential address of C. Kumar N. Patel. The DNP and DAP have organized a special memorial session on William A. ("Willie") Fowler for Friday evening.

The unity of physics is further emphasized by the annual meetings of three APS divisions coming together in Indianapolis: the DAP, Physics of Beams (DPB), Computational Physics (DCOMP) and the new Topical Group on Gravitation. Each division has its own specialized symposia, as well as sessions cosponsored and organized by other units of the APS. Some of those sessions are: Precision Experiments in Gravitation; Measuring Fundamental Properties of Complex Materials; Futures of Renewable Energy: Efficiency, Fission, and Fusion; and Particle Beam Processing of Materials.

Other joint sessions include Computations in Beam Physics; Synchrotron Radiation; High Energy Accelerators - Present and Near Term Future; Intense Beams; Beam Measurement and Accelerator Instrumentation; New Accelerator Facilities for Nuclear Physics: Opportunities and Challenges; High Energy Accelerators - Long-Term Future; Neutron Stars; The Physics of Novae and Supernovae; Plasma Astrophysics; Electron Beam Dynamics and Acceleration; New Developments in Few-Body Physics ; Lattice Gauge Theory; Structure of the Nucleon and Implications for RHIC; Topics in Particle Astrophysics; Progress in Fundamental Constants and Time Standards.

As always, there will be a number of social events. The Banquet, featuring physics demonstrations after dinner, is scheduled for Saturday evening following a no-host reception. There will be a special reception for graduate student members Thursday evening. A poster session is also planned in conjunction with the exhibit on Friday evening. All in all, this promises to be one of the most exciting Spring meetings in many years.

1996 May APS/AAPT Meeting - Indianapolis, IN
High Level Unified Physics Featured in Indianapolis

The Joint Meeting of the APS and the American Association of Physics Teachers will be held in Indianapolis, 2-5 May 1996. Planners anticipate the highest attendance at this meeting in many years, due not only to its central location and weekend schedule, but to changes in the program structure and a list of very impressive speakers.

Martin Perl (1995 Nobel Prize winner) will be speaking at the meeting. Kip Thorne, the 1995 Julius E. Lilienfeld Prize recipient will be delivering a talk at the Unity of Physics session on Friday, 3 May, as will Carl Wieman, who will be talking about recent results in Bose-Einstein condensation.

Part of the mission of the meeting is to emphasize the unity of the discipline of physics. Toward that end, on Thursday evening, there will be a special tri-divisional colloquium, organized by the Divisions of Nuclear Physics (DNP), Astrophysics (DAP), and Particles and Fields (DPF), entitled "Shadows of Creation: Dark Matter in the Universe" (see IN BRIEF). On Friday, the Unity of Physics session will also feature the retiring APS Presidential address of C. Kumar N. Patel. The DNP and DAP have organized a special memorial session on William A. ("Willie") Fowler for Friday evening.

The unity of physics is further emphasized by the annual meetings of three APS divisions coming together in Indianapolis: the DAP, Physics of Beams (DPB), Computational Physics (DCOMP) and the new Topical Group on Gravitation. Each division has its own specialized symposia, as well as sessions cosponsored and organized by other units of the APS. Some of those sessions are: Precision Experiments in Gravitation; Measuring Fundamental Properties of Complex Materials; Futures of Renewable Energy: Efficiency, Fission, and Fusion; and Particle Beam Processing of Materials.

Other joint sessions include Computations in Beam Physics; Synchrotron Radiation; High Energy Accelerators - Present and Near Term Future; Intense Beams; Beam Measurement and Accelerator Instrumentation; New Accelerator Facilities for Nuclear Physics: Opportunities and Challenges; High Energy Accelerators - Long-Term Future; Neutron Stars; The Physics of Novae and Supernovae; Plasma Astrophysics; Electron Beam Dynamics and Acceleration; New Developments in Few-Body Physics ; Lattice Gauge Theory; Structure of the Nucleon and Implications for RHIC; Topics in Particle Astrophysics; Progress in Fundamental Constants and Time Standards.

As always, there will be a number of social events. The Banquet, featuring physics demonstrations after dinner, is scheduled for Saturday evening following a no-host reception. There will be a special reception for graduate student members Thursday evening. A poster session is also planned in conjunction with the exhibit on Friday evening. All in all, this promises to be one of the most exciting Spring meetings in many years.

1996 May APS/AAPT Meeting - Indianapolis, IN
High Level Unified Physics Featured in Indianapolis

The Joint Meeting of the APS and the American Association of Physics Teachers will be held in Indianapolis, 2-5 May 1996. Planners anticipate the highest attendance at this meeting in many years, due not only to its central location and weekend schedule, but to changes in the program structure and a list of very impressive speakers.

Martin Perl (1995 Nobel Prize winner) will be speaking at the meeting. Kip Thorne, the 1995 Julius E. Lilienfeld Prize recipient will be delivering a talk at the Unity of Physics session on Friday, 3 May, as will Carl Wieman, who will be talking about recent results in Bose-Einstein condensation.

Part of the mission of the meeting is to emphasize the unity of the discipline of physics. Toward that end, on Thursday evening, there will be a special tri-divisional colloquium, organized by the Divisions of Nuclear Physics (DNP), Astrophysics (DAP), and Particles and Fields (DPF), entitled "Shadows of Creation: Dark Matter in the Universe" (see IN BRIEF). On Friday, the Unity of Physics session will also feature the retiring APS Presidential address of C. Kumar N. Patel. The DNP and DAP have organized a special memorial session on William A. ("Willie") Fowler for Friday evening.

The unity of physics is further emphasized by the annual meetings of three APS divisions coming together in Indianapolis: the DAP, Physics of Beams (DPB), Computational Physics (DCOMP) and the new Topical Group on Gravitation. Each division has its own specialized symposia, as well as sessions cosponsored and organized by other units of the APS. Some of those sessions are: Precision Experiments in Gravitation; Measuring Fundamental Properties of Complex Materials; Futures of Renewable Energy: Efficiency, Fission, and Fusion; and Particle Beam Processing of Materials.

Other joint sessions include Computations in Beam Physics; Synchrotron Radiation; High Energy Accelerators - Present and Near Term Future; Intense Beams; Beam Measurement and Accelerator Instrumentation; New Accelerator Facilities for Nuclear Physics: Opportunities and Challenges; High Energy Accelerators - Long-Term Future; Neutron Stars; The Physics of Novae and Supernovae; Plasma Astrophysics; Electron Beam Dynamics and Acceleration; New Developments in Few-Body Physics ; Lattice Gauge Theory; Structure of the Nucleon and Implications for RHIC; Topics in Particle Astrophysics; Progress in Fundamental Constants and Time Standards.

As always, there will be a number of social events. The Banquet, featuring physics demonstrations after dinner, is scheduled for Saturday evening following a no-host reception. There will be a special reception for graduate student members Thursday evening. A poster session is also planned in conjunction with the exhibit on Friday evening. All in all, this promises to be one of the most exciting Spring meetings in many years. 1996 May APS/AAPT Meeting - Indianapolis, IN
High Level Unified Physics Featured in Indianapolis

The Joint Meeting of the APS and the American Association of Physics Teachers will be held in Indianapolis, 2-5 May 1996. Planners anticipate the highest attendance at this meeting in many years, due not only to its central location and weekend schedule, but to changes in the program structure and a list of very impressive speakers.

Martin Perl (1995 Nobel Prize winner) will be speaking at the meeting. Kip Thorne, the 1995 Julius E. Lilienfeld Prize recipient will be delivering a talk at the Unity of Physics session on Friday, 3 May, as will Carl Wieman, who will be talking about recent results in Bose-Einstein condensation.

Part of the mission of the meeting is to emphasize the unity of the discipline of physics. Toward that end, on Thursday evening, there will be a special tri-divisional colloquium, organized by the Divisions of Nuclear Physics (DNP), Astrophysics (DAP), and Particles and Fields (DPF), entitled "Shadows of Creation: Dark Matter in the Universe" (see IN BRIEF). On Friday, the Unity of Physics session will also feature the retiring APS Presidential address of C. Kumar N. Patel. The DNP and DAP have organized a special memorial session on William A. ("Willie") Fowler for Friday evening.

The unity of physics is further emphasized by the annual meetings of three APS divisions coming together in Indianapolis: the DAP, Physics of Beams (DPB), Computational Physics (DCOMP) and the new Topical Group on Gravitation. Each division has its own specialized symposia, as well as sessions cosponsored and organized by other units of the APS. Some of those sessions are: Precision Experiments in Gravitation; Measuring Fundamental Properties of Complex Materials; Futures of Renewable Energy: Efficiency, Fission, and Fusion; and Particle Beam Processing of Materials.

Other joint sessions include Computations in Beam Physics; Synchrotron Radiation; High Energy Accelerators - Present and Near Term Future; Intense Beams; Beam Measurement and Accelerator Instrumentation; New Accelerator Facilities for Nuclear Physics: Opportunities and Challenges; High Energy Accelerators - Long-Term Future; Neutron Stars; The Physics of Novae and Supernovae; Plasma Astrophysics; Electron Beam Dynamics and Acceleration; New Developments in Few-Body Physics ; Lattice Gauge Theory; Structure of the Nucleon and Implications for RHIC; Topics in Particle Astrophysics; Progress in Fundamental Constants and Time Standards.

As always, there will be a number of social events. The Banquet, featuring physics demonstrations after dinner, is scheduled for Saturday evening following a no-host reception. There will be a special reception for graduate student members Thursday evening. A poster session is also planned in conjunction with the exhibit on Friday evening. All in all, this promises to be one of the most exciting Spring meetings in many years.


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Editor: Barrett H. Ripin