APS News

Council Approves Mass Media Fellowship Program

In November, the APS Council approved a proposal from the Forum on Education (FED) to establish an APS Mass Media Fellowship program to enable advanced physics students to spend up to three months working in the mass media. Its purpose is to improve communication and mutual understanding between physicists and the media, thus leading to better coverage and more accurate reporting of scientific topics and increased scientific literacy of the general public. The program will be administratively coordinated with a similar existing program of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Initially, the fellowships will be for two physicists in early stages of their careers, according to David Bodansky, chair of the APS Panel on Public Affairs, which endorsed the proposal. The cost of the program was estimated at $16,000 per year; following a three-year trial period, Council will re-evaluate the program and determine whether it should be continued.

"Physicists generally agree that the public doesn't understand or appreciate physics research," said FED Chair Ruth Howes (Ball State University). "Frequently we contrast inadequate media coverage of physics research with high quality coverage of astronomy or medical research." A forum subcommittee charged with exploring the possibility of media fellowships concluded that the best course of action for the APS would be to follow a model similar to that used for its Congressional Fellowship program.

"The AAAS fellowship program has proven itself effective in strengthening the connections between scientists and the mass media," said Howes of the reasons for operating within the AAAS' existing infrastructure. Now in its 20th year, the AAAS Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellowship Program supports 15-20 advanced science and engineering students for 10 weeks during the summer as reporters, researchers and production assistants in print and broadcast mass media organizations nationwide. The fellows are provided with an intensive orientation and assigned to participating media organizations through a network of AAAS contacts.

It is estimated that about half of the AAAS program participants have found employment in the media following their fellowships, while the others pursued careers in science and engineering. The program also provides a model for internships in which physics graduate students are encouraged to broadcast their training, and could serve as a model for other types of programs, such as industrial fellowships.

In November, the APS Council approved a proposal from the Forum on Education (FED) to establish an APS Mass Media Fellowship program to enable advanced physics students to spend up to three months working in the mass media. Its purpose is to improve communication and mutual understanding between physicists and the media, thus leading to better coverage and more accurate reporting of scientific topics and increased scientific literacy of the general public. The program will be administratively coordinated with a similar existing program of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Initially, the fellowships will be for two physicists in early stages of their careers, according to David Bodansky, chair of the APS Panel on Public Affairs, which endorsed the proposal. The cost of the program was estimated at $16,000 per year; following a three-year trial period, Council will re-evaluate the program and determine whether it should be continued.

"Physicists generally agree that the public doesn't understand or appreciate physics research," said FED Chair Ruth Howes (Ball State University). "Frequently we contrast inadequate media coverage of physics research with high quality coverage of astronomy or medical research." A forum subcommittee charged with exploring the possibility of media fellowships concluded that the best course of action for the APS would be to follow a model similar to that used for its Congressional Fellowship program.

"The AAAS fellowship program has proven itself effective in strengthening the connections between scientists and the mass media," said Howes of the reasons for operating within the AAAS' existing infrastructure. Now in its 20th year, the AAAS Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellowship Program supports 15-20 advanced science and engineering students for 10 weeks during the summer as reporters, researchers and production assistants in print and broadcast mass media organizations nationwide. The fellows are provided with an intensive orientation and assigned to participating media organizations through a network of AAAS contacts.

It is estimated that about half of the AAAS program participants have found employment in the media following their fellowships, while the others pursued careers in science and engineering. The program also provides a model for internships in which physics graduate students are encouraged to broadcast their training, and could serve as a model for other types of programs, such as industrial fellowships.

In November, the APS Council approved a proposal from the Forum on Education (FED) to establish an APS Mass Media Fellowship program to enable advanced physics students to spend up to three months working in the mass media. Its purpose is to improve communication and mutual understanding between physicists and the media, thus leading to better coverage and more accurate reporting of scientific topics and increased scientific literacy of the general public. The program will be administratively coordinated with a similar existing program of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Initially, the fellowships will be for two physicists in early stages of their careers, according to David Bodansky, chair of the APS Panel on Public Affairs, which endorsed the proposal. The cost of the program was estimated at $16,000 per year; following a three-year trial period, Council will re-evaluate the program and determine whether it should be continued.

"Physicists generally agree that the public doesn't understand or appreciate physics research," said FED Chair Ruth Howes (Ball State University). "Frequently we contrast inadequate media coverage of physics research with high quality coverage of astronomy or medical research." A forum subcommittee charged with exploring the possibility of media fellowships concluded that the best course of action for the APS would be to follow a model similar to that used for its Congressional Fellowship program.

"The AAAS fellowship program has proven itself effective in strengthening the connections between scientists and the mass media," said Howes of the reasons for operating within the AAAS' existing infrastructure. Now in its 20th year, the AAAS Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellowship Program supports 15-20 advanced science and engineering students for 10 weeks during the summer as reporters, researchers and production assistants in print and broadcast mass media organizations nationwide. The fellows are provided with an intensive orientation and assigned to participating media organizations through a network of AAAS contacts.

It is estimated that about half of the AAAS program participants have found employment in the media following their fellowships, while the others pursued careers in science and engineering. The program also provides a model for internships in which physics graduate students are encouraged to broadcast their training, and could serve as a model for other types of programs, such as industrial fellowships.

In November, the APS Council approved a proposal from the Forum on Education (FED) to establish an APS Mass Media Fellowship program to enable advanced physics students to spend up to three months working in the mass media. Its purpose is to improve communication and mutual understanding between physicists and the media, thus leading to better coverage and more accurate reporting of scientific topics and increased scientific literacy of the general public. The program will be administratively coordinated with a similar existing program of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Initially, the fellowships will be for two physicists in early stages of their careers, according to David Bodansky, chair of the APS Panel on Public Affairs, which endorsed the proposal. The cost of the program was estimated at $16,000 per year; following a three-year trial period, Council will re-evaluate the program and determine whether it should be continued.

"Physicists generally agree that the public doesn't understand or appreciate physics research," said FED Chair Ruth Howes (Ball State University). "Frequently we contrast inadequate media coverage of physics research with high quality coverage of astronomy or medical research." A forum subcommittee charged with exploring the possibility of media fellowships concluded that the best course of action for the APS would be to follow a model similar to that used for its Congressional Fellowship program.

"The AAAS fellowship program has proven itself effective in strengthening the connections between scientists and the mass media," said Howes of the reasons for operating within the AAAS' existing infrastructure. Now in its 20th year, the AAAS Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellowship Program supports 15-20 advanced science and engineering students for 10 weeks during the summer as reporters, researchers and production assistants in print and broadcast mass media organizations nationwide. The fellows are provided with an intensive orientation and assigned to participating media organizations through a network of AAAS contacts.

It is estimated that about half of the AAAS program participants have found employment in the media following their fellowships, while the others pursued careers in science and engineering. The program also provides a model for internships in which physics graduate students are encouraged to broadcast their training, and could serve as a model for other types of programs, such as industrial fellowships.

In November, the APS Council approved a proposal from the Forum on Education (FED) to establish an APS Mass Media Fellowship program to enable advanced physics students to spend up to three months working in the mass media. Its purpose is to improve communication and mutual understanding between physicists and the media, thus leading to better coverage and more accurate reporting of scientific topics and increased scientific literacy of the general public. The program will be administratively coordinated with a similar existing program of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Initially, the fellowships will be for two physicists in early stages of their careers, according to David Bodansky, chair of the APS Panel on Public Affairs, which endorsed the proposal. The cost of the program was estimated at $16,000 per year; following a three-year trial period, Council will re-evaluate the program and determine whether it should be continued.

"Physicists generally agree that the public doesn't understand or appreciate physics research," said FED Chair Ruth Howes (Ball State University). "Frequently we contrast inadequate media coverage of physics research with high quality coverage of astronomy or medical research." A forum subcommittee charged with exploring the possibility of media fellowships concluded that the best course of action for the APS would be to follow a model similar to that used for its Congressional Fellowship program.

"The AAAS fellowship program has proven itself effective in strengthening the connections between scientists and the mass media," said Howes of the reasons for operating within the AAAS' existing infrastructure. Now in its 20th year, the AAAS Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellowship Program supports 15-20 advanced science and engineering students for 10 weeks during the summer as reporters, researchers and production assistants in print and broadcast mass media organizations nationwide. The fellows are provided with an intensive orientation and assigned to participating media organizations through a network of AAAS contacts.

It is estimated that about half of the AAAS program participants have found employment in the media following their fellowships, while the others pursued careers in science and engineering. The program also provides a model for internships in which physics graduate students are encouraged to broadcast their training, and could serve as a model for other types of programs, such as industrial fellowships.

In November, the APS Council approved a proposal from the Forum on Education (FED) to establish an APS Mass Media Fellowship program to enable advanced physics students to spend up to three months working in the mass media. Its purpose is to improve communication and mutual understanding between physicists and the media, thus leading to better coverage and more accurate reporting of scientific topics and increased scientific literacy of the general public. The program will be administratively coordinated with a similar existing program of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Initially, the fellowships will be for two physicists in early stages of their careers, according to David Bodansky, chair of the APS Panel on Public Affairs, which endorsed the proposal. The cost of the program was estimated at $16,000 per year; following a three-year trial period, Council will re-evaluate the program and determine whether it should be continued.

"Physicists generally agree that the public doesn't understand or appreciate physics research," said FED Chair Ruth Howes (Ball State University). "Frequently we contrast inadequate media coverage of physics research with high quality coverage of astronomy or medical research." A forum subcommittee charged with exploring the possibility of media fellowships concluded that the best course of action for the APS would be to follow a model similar to that used for its Congressional Fellowship program.

"The AAAS fellowship program has proven itself effective in strengthening the connections between scientists and the mass media," said Howes of the reasons for operating within the AAAS' existing infrastructure. Now in its 20th year, the AAAS Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellowship Program supports 15-20 advanced science and engineering students for 10 weeks during the summer as reporters, researchers and production assistants in print and broadcast mass media organizations nationwide. The fellows are provided with an intensive orientation and assigned to participating media organizations through a network of AAAS contacts.

It is estimated that about half of the AAAS program participants have found employment in the media following their fellowships, while the others pursued careers in science and engineering. The program also provides a model for internships in which physics graduate students are encouraged to broadcast their training, and could serve as a model for other types of programs, such as industrial fellowships.

In November, the APS Council approved a proposal from the Forum on Education (FED) to establish an APS Mass Media Fellowship program to enable advanced physics students to spend up to three months working in the mass media. Its purpose is to improve communication and mutual understanding between physicists and the media, thus leading to better coverage and more accurate reporting of scientific topics and increased scientific literacy of the general public. The program will be administratively coordinated with a similar existing program of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Initially, the fellowships will be for two physicists in early stages of their careers, according to David Bodansky, chair of the APS Panel on Public Affairs, which endorsed the proposal. The cost of the program was estimated at $16,000 per year; following a three-year trial period, Council will re-evaluate the program and determine whether it should be continued.

"Physicists generally agree that the public doesn't understand or appreciate physics research," said FED Chair Ruth Howes (Ball State University). "Frequently we contrast inadequate media coverage of physics research with high quality coverage of astronomy or medical research." A forum subcommittee charged with exploring the possibility of media fellowships concluded that the best course of action for the APS would be to follow a model similar to that used for its Congressional Fellowship program.

"The AAAS fellowship program has proven itself effective in strengthening the connections between scientists and the mass media," said Howes of the reasons for operating within the AAAS' existing infrastructure. Now in its 20th year, the AAAS Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellowship Program supports 15-20 advanced science and engineering students for 10 weeks during the summer as reporters, researchers and production assistants in print and broadcast mass media organizations nationwide. The fellows are provided with an intensive orientation and assigned to participating media organizations through a network of AAAS contacts.

It is estimated that about half of the AAAS program participants have found employment in the media following their fellowships, while the others pursued careers in science and engineering. The program also provides a model for internships in which physics graduate students are encouraged to broadcast their training, and could serve as a model for other types of programs, such as industrial fellowships.


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Editor: Barrett H. Ripin