Charles David Keeling

Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, California

Accurately Recording CO2 Atmospheric Levels

Charles David Keeling taking measurements

Charles David Keeling

Charles David Keeling's recording of carbon dioxide has become the world's most famous record of human-caused emission of greenhouse gases.

The Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California sponsored Keeling's work from 1958 - 2005. Scripps enabled Keeling to establish a collection site on Mauna Loa in Hawaii. The Mauna Loa site is 2 miles above sea level and its atmosphere is less variable than that of North America.

graph of the keeling curve
Courtesy Scripps Institution

The Keeling Curve: Monthly Carbon Dioxide Concentrations through 2011

Keeling first began collecting carbon dioxide samples in 1958. Keeling was able to note strong seasonal variations in carbon dioxide: CO2 measurements peaked during times of plant growth and decreased during dormancy.

Keeling was so dedicated to precision that by 1960 he was able to produce data showing that while CO2 levels increased and decreased in the course of a year, there was a detectable rise in CO2 over time. This steady rise in CO2 has come to be called the "Keeling Curve".

Although the key atmospheric measurements were made in Hawaii, APS chose to designate Scripps as the historic site because the analysis and development of the data, as well as Keeling's critical interactions with then Scripps Director Roger Revelle, took place in La Jolla.

Presentation of the Commemorative Plaque


APS President Barry Barish (left) with Scripps Director Tony Haymet about to remove the poster, "Weathermen of the Apocalypse" to reveal the commemorative plaque.

Unveiling the plaque

APS Historic Sites Committee Chair Ben Bederson (left), Tony Haymet, and Barry Barish reading the Scripps Institution APS Historic Site commemorative plaque.

Gray arrow  View the Scripps Plaque