APS in the News

News stories referencing or stemming from APS journals, meetings, and programs.

Archived APS in the News
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2017

Possible Hierarchy Problem Solution
January 4, 2017
One of the unanswered questions in particle physics is the hierarchy problem, which has implications for understanding why some of the fundamental forces are so much stronger than others. A newly proposed solution involves multiple (up to 1016) copies of the Standard Model, each with a different Higgs vacuum expectation value.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Test Probes Equivalence Principle, General Relativity, and Spacetime 'Foam'
January 5, 2017
Physicists have performed a test designed to investigate the effects of the expansion of the universe — hoping to answer questions such as "does it affect laboratory experiments?" and "does spacetime have a foam-like structure that slightly changes the speed of photons over time?"­, an idea that could shed light on the connection between general relativity and quantum gravity.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

What's Causing These Eerie Spinning Ice Discs?
January 10, 2017
Physics causes some strange phenomena, like slowly-rotating discs of ice on a frozen river that resemble UFO saucers. But have no fear, science is here to explain away your excitement.
Article: Gizmodo
Abstract: Physical Review E

Shimmering Soap Bubbles Have A Dark Side
January 12, 2017
Zoom in on a soap bubble just before it bursts and brilliant, complex patterns emerge. Shimmery rainbows appear in thicker portions of the soap film, while clusters of dark spots appear in the thinnest regions. Over about a minute, those spots grow and merge. This effect, known as “coarsening,” pops up in other places too, but this is the first time physicists have studied the details of the effect in bubbles.
Article: Science News
Abstract: APS Division of Fluid Dynamics 2016

Violations of energy conservation in the early universe may explain dark energy
January 20, 2017
Physicists have proposed that violations of energy conservation in the early universe, as predicted by certain modified theories of quantum mechanics and quantum gravity, may explain the cosmological constant problem, which is sometimes referred to as "the worst theoretical prediction in the history of physics."
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Scientists Have Made A New Kind Of Invisibility Cloak
January 22, 2017
Concealing objects in direct light is already a difficult feat. While there is ongoing research into invisibility cloaks of some form or other, researchers at the Public University of Navarre (NUP/UPNA) and the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV) are taking a not-so-straightforward approach. In particular, they are interested in developing a cloaking mechanism that works by bending light.
Article: Futurism
Abstract: Physical Review A

Quasi-Phase Transition Spotted In Water-Filled Carbon Nanotubes
January 23, 2017
The optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) change when the tiny structures are filled with water. That is the conclusion of scientists in Belgium and the US, who attribute the change to a "quasi-phase transition" that occurs in the water — although the exact nature of the transition is unknown.
Article: Physics World
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Presenting time crystals, physics' newest material
January 26, 2017
Crystals feature an atomic lattice structure repeated in space. Time crystals repeat their atomic structure in time. Norman Yao, a physicist at the University of California, Berkeley, laid out the theoretical blueprint for time crystals in a paper published last week in the journal Physical Review Letters.
Article: UPI
Viewpoint: Physics

Spin May Reveal Black Hole History
January 30, 2017
Researchers have devised a test to see if pairs of black holes — famous for creating gravitational waves when they merge — themselves formed from multiple mergers of smaller black holes.
Article: Science News
Abstract: APS April Meeting 2017

Hunting Dark Matter With GPS Data
January 30, 2017
A team of physicists has used data from GPS satellites to hunt for dark matter, the mysterious stuff whose gravity appears to hold galaxies together. They found no signs of a hypothetical type of dark matter, which consists of flaws in the fabric of space called topological defects.
Article: Science Now
Abstract: APS April Meeting 2017

Analogue Black Hole Could Be Made From Plasma Mirror
January 30, 2017
An analogue to the creation of Hawking radiation at the event horizon of a black hole could be made by firing an intense laser pulse at specially designed targets. That's the conclusion of physicists in Taiwan and France, who say that the "plasma mirror" created in the proposed experiment could be used to study the relationship between quantum particles inside and outside a black hole.
Article: Physics World
Synopsis: Physics

Are we living in a giant hologram?
January 30, 2017
A new study suggests the universe is a hologram. Cosmologists have long struggled to develop a unified model of the universe. Problems arise when trying to forge an agreement between models used to describe the cosmos at different scales — general relativity and quantum theory.
Article: UPI
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

NASA's Fermi telescope spots record-breaking blazars
January 31, 2017
Monster black holes shooting jets of gamma-ray radiation right at us have been spotted farther away than ever before, dating back to when the universe was nearly one-tenth its current age.
Article: Scientific American
Abstract: APS April Meeting 2017

'Hidden' Solar Flares Linked To High-Energy Gamma-Rays For 1st Time
January 31, 2017
Solar eruptions hidden by the light of the sun are releasing bursts of energy roughly 30 times more powerful than ever seen before, and for the first time, an international team of scientists has associated these hidden flares with high-energy gamma-rays.
Article: Space.com
Abstract: APS April Meeting 2017

Physicists seek neutron lifetime's secret
February 1, 2017
Lone neutrons quickly decay, but scientists don’t agree on how long the particles stick around before their demise. New experiments could resolve the dispute — or deepen the mystery.
Article: Science News
Abstract: APS April Meeting 2017

Russia Open To Increased Cooperation With The United States On Space Programs
February 1, 2017
The Russian ambassador to the United States said Jan. 31 that Russia would be open to enhanced cooperation in space should the Trump administration pursue improved relations between the countries.
Article: Space News
Abstract: APS April Meeting 2017

Yale Researchers Create Liquid Metal That Mimics Earth's Magnetic Core
February 2, 2017
Researchers at Yale University have made a new material from liquid metal and magnetic particles. When flowing, its ability to generate and modify magnetic fields is up to five times stronger than pure liquid metal.
Article: Daily Mail
Abstract: Physical Review Fluids

The Thermodynamics Of Learning
February 6, 2017
While investigating how efficiently the brain can learn new information, physicists have found that, at the neuronal level, learning efficiency is ultimately limited by the laws of thermodynamics — the same principles that limit the efficiency of many other familiar processes.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Starlight test shows quantum world has been weird for 600 years
February 7, 2017
Our universe has been ruled by weirdness for at least six centuries. If the quantum effects in a new experiment aren’t genuine, but are somehow caused by past meddling, then that is how long ago it must have happened – a finding that makes would-be alternatives to quantum theory even more unlikely.
Article: New Scientist
Synopsis: Physics

Never-Before-Seen Topological Solitons Experimentally Realized In Liquid Crystals
February 7, 2017
Physicists have discovered that dozens of 3-D knotted structures called "topological solitons" can be created and frozen for long periods of time in liquid crystals like those used in electronic displays. Until now, topological solitons have been realized only in a few experiments, and for such a short time that it has been impossible to study them in any detail.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review X

LIGO Doesn't Just Detect Gravitational Waves. It Makes Them, Too
February 7, 2017
The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is not only the most sensitive detector of ripples in spacetime. It also happens to be the world's best producer of gravitational waves, a team of physicists now calculates.
Article: Science Now
Abstract: APS April Meeting 2017

Decaying Atoms Feel A Tiny Frictional Force, Say Physicists
February 9, 2017
An excited atom decaying in a vacuum experiences a force very similar to friction, according to calculations done by physicists in the U.K. At first sight, the result appears to violate Einstein's equivalence principle. However, the researchers calculate that, in fact, relativity rides to its own rescue, and the mass lost from the atom as it decays to the ground state allows it to lose momentum without slowing down.
Article: Physics World
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Irish Scientists Create Math Formula For Better Soft Membrane Tech Results
February 18, 2017
The technology behind materials used in artificial muscles and ‘smart clothes’ could be significantly advanced thanks to new Irish research.
Article: Irish Examiner
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Scientists SMASH Five Of The Biggest Mysteries Of Modern Physics
Fenbruary 20, 2017
It’s five theories for the price of one. One of the most ambitious physics theories in recent times claims to have solved five of the biggest head-scratchers in particle physics – each of them likely worthy of a Nobel prize in their own right.
Article: Cosmos
Synopsis: Physics

Physicists Investigate Erasing Information At Zero Energy Cost
February 22, 2017
A few years ago, physicists showed that it's possible to erase information without using any energy, showing that the cost of erasure could be paid in terms of an arbitrary physical quantity such as spin angular momentum. New results reveal insight into the thermodynamics of spin and could also guide the development of future applications.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

That crumpled candy wrapper remembers what you did
February 23, 2017
Take a look at that crumpled-up piece of litter on your desk, compressed by the laws of physics and tossed aside. It remembers what you did, even if no one else does.
Article: Gizmodo
Viewpoint: Physics

The Physics Of Ice Bridges
February 28, 2017
A new model describes how floating ice can get jammed in a narrow strait, creating a giant frozen walkway.
Article: Inside Science
Synopsis: Physics

Meet The 'Angulon' Quasiparticle
March 3, 2017
The quasiparticle concept allows physicists to describe complex, many-body interactions in terms of the behaviour of a single particle-like entity. Usually these particles turn up in condensed-matter systems such as semiconductors, but a new type of quasiparticle known as an angulon has been proposed to describe the rotation of an atomic or molecular impurity within a solvent.
Article: Physics World
Viewpoint: Physics

Neutrinos Should Help Identify Supernovae Types
March 3, 2017
A team of researchers at North Carolina State University has found that current and future neutrino detectors placed around the world should be capable of detecting neutrinos emitted from a relatively close supernova.
Article: PhysOrg
Synopsis: Physics

A Slowdown At The Sun's Surface Explained
March 10, 2017
Never underestimate the power of a little sunlight. Light particles, or photons, emitted from the sun’s surface, could explain a long-standing solar mystery — why the sun’s outermost layers rotate more slowly than its core.
Article: Science News
Focus: Physics

Butterfly On The Wall
March 10, 2017
There's no end to the patterns you can discover in numbers. You might even stumble on one that nobody has seen before. That’s Douglas Hofstadter’s ‘endlessly rich world.’
Article: Live Mint
Session: APS March Meeting 2017

Frozen Droplets Explode On Camera
March 13, 2017
Water expands when it freezes, so scientists wondered what would happen if water was frozen from the outside in. Answer: It explodes. The researchers filmed their water-droplet experiment, offering a slow-motion view of the exploding ice.
Article: Live Science
Synopsis: Physics

Superfluid Helium Behaves Like Black Holes
March 16, 2017
Black holes and superfluids make for strange bedfellows: One is famous for being so dense that light can’t escape, and the other is a bizarre liquid that flows without friction. But new computer simulations confirm that superfluid helium follows an unusual rule known from black holes — one with mysterious significance for physics.
Article: Science News
Abstract: APS March Meeting 2017

Meet Physics Girl
March 16, 2017
Dianna Cowern — a.k.a. Physics Girl — has one of those invent-it-yourself jobs that exist only in the age of the internet. In 2011, she graduated with an undergraduate degree in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. That year she also began a YouTube channel, posting videos explaining various physical effects.
Article: Science Now
Abstract: APS March Meeting 2017

World's Lakes Are Much Shallower Than
March 17, 2017
The world’s lakes are only about two-thirds as deep, on average, as previously thought, researchers reported last week at a meeting of the American Physical Society. If correct, the finding could help climate scientists more accurately model global climate change, as shallower lakes generate more heat-trapping methane gas.
Article: Science Now
Abstract: APS March Meeting 2017

Introducing A New Kind Of Microscope
March 17, 2017
Scientists have developed a new kind of microscope that can detect tiny changes in a material's delicate magnetic field. The instrument could help researchers make progress on many frontier problems in physics, such as understanding how superconductivity and magnetism interact, and designing better data storage devices.
Article: Inside Science
Abstract: APS March Meeting 2017
Viewpoint: Physics

Single-Atom Magnets Store Bits Of Data
March 20, 2017
The tiniest electronic gadgets have nothing on a new data-storage device. Each bit is encoded using the magnetic field of a single atom — making for extremely compact data storage, although researchers have stored only two bits of data so far.
Article: Science News
Abstract: APS March Meeting 2017

Life On Earth May Have Begun As Dividing Droplets
March 21, 2017
In a primordial soup on ancient Earth, droplets of chemicals may have paved the way for the first cells. Shape-shifting droplets split, grow and split again in new computer simulations. The result indicates that simple chemical blobs can exhibit replication, one of the most basic properties of life.
Article: Science News
Abstract: APS March Meeting 2017

Raindrop Crater
March 23, 2017
Craters left by bombs and asteroids get all the press, but what happens when a raindrop plows into sandy soil? To find out, scientists used syringes to create droplets of a consistent size, then released the drops over a bed of tiny glass beads meant to represent loose sand. The more tightly packed the beads, the shallower the crater.
Article: Science Now
Abstract: Physical Review E

Portal Might Link Standard Model To Dark Physics
March 24, 2017
Theoretical physicists have put forward a new hypothesis that aims to connect the world of visible physics to the hidden forces of our Universe: what if there's a portal that bridges the gap between the standard model to dark matter and dark energy?
Article: Science Alert
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Origami Microscopic Machines
March 24, 2017
Thirty years ago, a professor in Japan folded an origami crane smaller than a pinhead. Peering through a microscope, he used a sewing needle to carefully crimp the paper. Now researchers at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, have gone one step further, creating origami about the size of a red blood cell. Too small for human hands, their origami folds itself. This new take on an old tradition is made not from paper, but from sheets of glass and carbon only a few atoms thick.
Article: Inside Science
Abstract: APS March Meeting 2017

Playing Nuclear Chess With North Korea
March 29, 2017
Earlier this month, North Korea threatened to retaliate with nuclear weapons if the U.S. or South Korea "fire even a single bullet" at the sovereign state. While this seemingly extreme statement fits the mainstream narrative of a paranoid regime, some experts hold a different view.
Article: Inside Science
Abstract: APS March Meeting 2017

Entangled Photons Can Originate From Different Points In Space
March 30, 2017
Our intuitions about how things are, or should be, serve us well in our daily lives. But that’s only because in the macroscopic level of reality that we inhabit, we don’t have to deal with the weirdness and “spookiness” that emerges in the realm of subatomic particles.
Article: International Business Times
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Dust To Dust, Boulders To Boulders
April 2, 2017
Back in 2005 a small asteroid, known as 25143 Itokawa, was visited by the unmanned Japanese spacecraft, Hayabusa. Close up images of the asteroid — which measures approximately 540m by 250m — revealed that the “lowlands” were covered by dust and centimeter-sized small pebbles, whilst the “highlands” were made up of larger boulders (5 to 40m diameter). But how did this segregation come about?
Article: The Guardian
Focus: Physics

Route To High-Speed Quantum Computing Paved With Error
April 3, 2017
When it comes to quantum computing, mostly I get excited about experimental results rather than ideas for new hardware. New devices — or new ways to implement old devices — may end up being useful, but we won't know for sure when the results are in. If we are to grade existing ideas by their usefulness, then adiabatic quantum computing has to be right up there, since you can use it to perform some computations now.
Article: Ars Technica
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Bell correlations measured in 500,000 atoms
April 7 2017
Bell correlations — a hallmark of an entangled quantum system — have been spotted in an ensemble of 500,000 rubidium-87 atoms. The atoms were prepared in spin-squeezed states by physicists at Stanford University in the US and the correlations measured to a whopping statistical significance of 124σ.
Article: Physics World
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

New Insight Into The Riemann hypothesis
April 7, 2017
Researchers have discovered that the solutions to a famous mathematical function called the Riemann zeta function correspond to the solutions of another, different kind of function that may make it easier to solve one of the biggest problems in mathematics: the Riemann hypothesis. If the results can be rigorously verified, then it would finally prove the Riemann hypothesis, which is worth a $1,000,000 Millennium Prize from the Clay Mathematics Institute.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Diamonds Coupled Using Quantum Physics
April 10, 2017
Atomic defects in diamonds can be used as quantum memories. For the first time, researchers have succeeded in coupling the defects in various diamonds using quantum physics.
Article: NanoWerk
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Unusual Force Acting On Nanoparticles
April 10, 2017
Different sets of rules govern matter at different scales. As nanotechnologies becomes smaller, scientists are paying closer attention to the physical laws of infinitesimal scales.
Article: UPI
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

There Are Way Worse Ways Carbon Monoxide Can Kill You
April 12, 2017
Us Earthlings are quite lucky to be living at around standard temperature and pressure. Life has evolved to comfortably handle the shapes in which most molecules have arranged themselves under temperatures of about 32 degrees Fahrenheit and atmospheric pressures of an average day at sea level. But on other planets, at other temperatures and pressures, lots of things we take for granted would probably just kill us. Even the usual killers might be worse.
Article: Gizmodo
Abstract: Physical Review B

Negative Mass Fluid
April 13, 2017
Scientists claim to have created a fluid with negative mass, meaning it behaves unlike every physical object in the world. When an object with mass is pushed, it will accelerate in the direction of the force, whereas one with negative mass will accelerate toward the force pushing it.
Article: iNews
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Does space heat up when you accelerate?
April 14, 2017
More than 40 years ago, a leading relativity theorist made a surprising prediction. Whereas empty space should feel immeasurably cold to any observer gliding along at a constant speed, one who is accelerating, say because he's riding a rocket, would find empty space hot. This so-called Unruh effect seemed practically impossible to measure, but now four theorists claim they have devised a doable experiment that could confirm the underlying physics.
Article: Science
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Three-Photon Interference Measured At Long Last
April 17, 2017
Quantum interference involving three photons has been measured by two independent teams of physicists. Seeing the effect requires the ability to deliver three indistinguishable photons to the same place at the same time and also to ensure that much more common single-photon and two-photon interference effects are eliminated from the measurements.
Article: Physics World
Viewpoint: Physics

The First Quantum Computer You Own Could Be Powered By A Time Crystal
April 18, 2017
Now that researchers have created time crystals, the next step is to understand more about this bizarre material. A team of researchers from Harvard University are doing just that in order to explore potential applications of time crystals.
Article: Futurism
Viewpoint: Physics

There's Still A Lot We Don't Know About The Proton
April 18, 2017
Nuclear physicist Evangeline Downie hadn’t planned to study one of the thorniest puzzles of the proton. But when opportunity knocked, Downie couldn’t say no. “It’s the proton,” she exclaims. The mysteries that still swirl around this jewel of the subatomic realm were too tantalizing to resist.
Articles: Science News
Abstract: Physical Review D

Indian Scientists Find New Ways To Detect 'Naked Singularity'
April 21, 2017
In a significant theoretical advance, a team of scientists from the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) has found novel ways to detect a bare or naked "singularity" - the most extreme object in the universe.
Article: The Economic Times
Abstract: Physical Review D

New Laser Technique Improves Neutron Yield
April 21, 2017
A team of researchers from several institutions in China has developed a new way to produce neutrons that they claim improves on conventional methods by a factor of 100. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the team describes the new method and the results they obtained when testing it.
Article: PhysOrg
Synopsis: Physics

Does Dark Matter Exist? Computer Simulations Of Formation Of Galaxies Suggest It Does
April 24, 2017
A new study, based on supercomputer simulations that modeled the behavior of galaxies over billions of years of cosmic evolution, shows that the presence of dark matter can explain the diverse population of galaxies in the present-day universe.
Article: International Business Times
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

The Search Is On For Elusive Particle Decay
April 27, 2017
A U.S. experiment to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay has got the green light to start operations. The Majorana Demonstrator, located at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, received "Critical Decision 4" from the Department of Energy (DOE) in March. The decision certifies that the experiment met its "performance parameters", including the need for ultra-low background measurements.
Article: PhysicsWorld
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Stray Wi-fi Signals Could Let Spies See Inside Closed Rooms
April 28, 2017
Your wireless router may be giving you away in manner you never dreamed of. For the first time, physicists have used radio waves from a Wi-Fi transmitter to encode a 3D image of a real object in a hologram similar to the image of Princess Leia projected by R2D2 in the movie Star Wars. In principle, the technique could enable outsiders to “see” the inside of a room using only the Wi-Fi signals leaking out of it, although some researchers say such spying may be easier said than done.
Article: Science Now
Focus: Physics

Atom Interferometry Heats Up With Warm-vapor Device
May 1, 2017
An atom interferometer that does not have to be cooled to cryognenic temperatures has been created by physicists in the U.S. The new device instead employs a cell of warm vapor. The absence of bulky cooling equipment means the device could potentially feature in simple atomic sensors designed for a range of applications — including measuring accelerations with great precision.
Article: Physics World
Viewpoint: Physics

Quantum Effects Lead To More Powerful Battery Charging
May 1, 2017
Physicists have theoretically shown that, when multiple nanoscale batteries are coupled together, they can be charged faster than if each battery was charged individually. The improvement arises from collective quantum phenomena and is rooted in the emerging field of quantum thermodynamics — the study of how quantum effects influence the traditional laws governing energy and work.
Article: PhysOrg
Synopsis: Physics

Swirling Bacteria Linked To The Physics Of Phase Transitions
May 4, 2017
At first glance, the movie didn’t seem like much: a chaotic swarm of E. coli bacteria twiddling this way and that in a petri dish, seemingly at random. Such scenes are daily fare in bacteriology labs around the world.
Article: Quanta Magazine
Abstract: APS March Meeting 2017
Abstract: Physical Review E
Abstract: Physical Review Letters
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Physicists Predict Supercurrent Driven By Potential Information Transfer
May 10, 2017
Physicists have theoretically shown that a superconducting current of electrons can be induced to flow by a new kind of transport mechanism: the potential flow of information. This unusual phenomenon is predicted to exist in chiral channels — channels in which electrons are usually restricted to flowing in one direction only—but has never been theoretically demonstrated before now.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Antiproton Count Hints At Dark Matter Annihilation
May 11, 2017
Whiffs of dark matter may be blowing in on a cosmic ray breeze. Antiprotons streaming down on Earth from space could be hinting at the existence of the invisible substance, two teams of researchers suggest.
Article: Science News
Synopsis: Physics

Single Atoms Feel Tidal Force
May 11, 2017
Physicists have used interferometry to detect the minute tidal forces acting on individual atoms exposed to a local gravitational field. This allowed them to measure the curvature of space–time on a very small scale and argue that their observations are perhaps "the first of gravity in a quantum-mechanical system."
Article: Physics World
Viewpoint: Physics

Physicists Sketch Plans For A Matter-wave Tractor Beam
May 15, 2017
A team of physicists have outlined a means of making tractor beams to push and pull objects at a distance using “matter waves”, those strange analogues of light waves that underlie quantum mechanics. Tractor beams, staple tools of science fiction for remotely pulling in space shuttles and yanking away incoming space debris, have been edging into reality in recent years.
Article: Cosmos
Synopsis: Physics

Controversial Theory Says Expansion Of Universe Is Driven By Quantum Fluctuations — not Dark Energy
May 16, 2017
Scientists do not know exactly why the universe is expanding at an ever-accelerating pace, but the most popular theory is that this growth is being driven by dark energy, the theoretical force thought to make up 68 percent of the universe. University of British Columbia researchers have another theory — that quantum fluctuations of vacuum energy are responsible.
Article: Newsweek
Abstract: Physical Review D

Understanding Languages With Physics And Math
May 16, 2017
A husband and wife scientist duo from Poland has developed a computer model that simulates how vocabulary exchanges occur between settlers and nomads. According to their results, the nomadic groups are more likely to adopt words from settlers than the other way around.
Article: Inside Science
Abstract: Physical Review E

Stars As Random Number Generators Could Test Foundations Of Physics
May 16, 2017
Stars, quasars, and other celestial objects generate photons in a random way, and now scientists have taken advantage of this randomness to generate random numbers at rates of more than one million numbers per second. Generating random numbers at very high rates has a variety of applications, such as in cryptography and computer simulations. But the researchers in the new study are also interested in using these cosmic random number generators for another purpose: to test the foundations of physics by progressively addressing another loophole in the Bell tests.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Bose–einstein Condensates Simulate Transformation Of Elusive Magnetic Monopoles
May 22, 2017
A team of physicists led by David Hall from Amherst College, USA, and Mikko Möttönen from Aalto University, Finland, has experimentally demonstrated the relationship between two different analogues of magnetic monopoles. The results, published in Physical Review X, provide the first demonstration of quantum monopole dynamics.
Article: Cosmos
Abstract: Physical Review X

Have Gravitational Waves Scarred The Fabric Of Spacetime?
May 22, 2017
Car crashes, nuclear explosions, and even asteroid impacts are relatively puny compared with some of our universe’s other explosive events. Heck, a violent, seemingly infinitely hot explosion is probably what set the whole universe in motion in the first place. So big collisions, like those between black holes many times the mass of our sun, could have some pretty wild consequences. Like scarring spacetime itself.
Article: Gizmodo
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Physicists Uncover Similarities Between Classical And Quantum Machine Learning
May 31, 2017
Physicists have found that the structure of certain types of quantum learning algorithms is very similar to their classical counterparts — a finding that will help scientists further develop the quantum versions. Classical machine learning algorithms are currently used for performing complex computational tasks, such as pattern recognition or classification in large amounts of data, and constitute a crucial part of many modern technologies.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Sandboxes Could Help Inspire More Efficient Wheels For Heavy Equipment
May 31, 2017
For some engineers at MIT, playing in a sandbox isn’t just fun and games. It’s also the starting point for a new way of evaluating how wheels move through sand, a mathematical calculation that could pave the way forward for tires and treads that move more efficiently, carrying large trucks, heavy equipment, and even rovers on other planets over shifting, dangerous ground.
Article: Popular Science
Synopsis: Physics

LIGO Bags Its Third Black-hole Merger
June 1, 2017
A third gravitational wave has been detected by physicists working on the LIGO gravitational-wave detectors in the US. The wave was produced by two black holes that merged about 3 billion light-years from Earth. One black hole was 31 times more massive than the Sun and the other weighed in at 19 solar masses.
Article: Physics World
Synopsis: Physics

Scientists Reignite Thirty-year-old Debate About Glass With New Calculation
June 2, 2017
Mathematics is far more fraught with debate and disagreement than you might imagine. Arguments about things some of the smartest physicists have trouble understanding rage for years. Recently, a pair of mathematicians ignited some old flames — or rather, shattered some glass — with a new set of results that, if correct, have far-reaching implications in physics and even cybersecurity.
Article: Gizmodo
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

How To Synchronize Like Fireflies
June 2, 2017
Every June in Elkmont, Tennessee, fireflies light up the valley in spectacular fashion, creating one of the most vibrant bioluminescent displays in nature. Swarms of the firefly known as Photonius carolinus synchronize their flashes in a display that observers often compare to stars falling and fireworks exploding.
Article: Inside Science
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Gas Marbles Able To Roll Around In The Hand Could Be Used To Store Gasses
June 7, 2017
A trio of researchers with Université Paris-Est has discovered a new type of spherical bubble — called a gas marble, it is similar to bubbles made with soap, but has a coating of much smaller polystyrene microspheres. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the team describes how their discovery came about, some of the properties of the spheres, and possible uses for them.
Article: PhysOrg
Focus: Physics

Fiber-linked Atomic Clocks Put Special Relativity To The Test
June 7, 2017
Atomic clocks in France, Germany and the UK have been used to perform the best-ever confirmation of time dilation as set out in Einstein’s special theory of relativity. The clocks have been connected recently by optical-fibre links, which let the devices be compared to each other to an extremely high degree of statistical resolution. The work was done by an international team of physicists that says the test could still be improved further by several orders of magnitude.
Article: Physics World
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Is Turbulent Flow Universal After All?
June 8, 2017
Identifying universal laws within fluid mechanics is notoriously difficult. So it has come as a disappointment that recent experimental and computational results have cast doubt on one of the very few relations that was thought to hold true across all turbulent, bounded fluid flows. But now a physicist in Italy reckons that by tweaking the formula in question — which stipulates that such flows have a logarithmic velocity profile — it does indeed prove to be universal.
Article: Physics World
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

We're One Step Closer To Knowing Why There's More Matter Than Antimatter In The Universe
June 8, 2017
The Standard Model of particle physics has been the predominant means of explaining what the basic building blocks of matter are and how they interact for decades. First proposed in the 1970s, the model claims that for every particle created, there is an anti-particle. As such, an enduring mystery posed by this model is why the Universe can exist if it is theoretically made up of equal parts of matter and antimatter.
Article: Universe Today
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Solving Systems Of Linear Equations With Quantum Mechanics
June 9, 2017
Physicists have experimentally demonstrated a purely quantum method for solving systems of linear equations that has the potential to work exponentially faster than the best classical methods. The results show that quantum computing may eventually have far-reaching practical applications, since solving linear systems is commonly done throughout science and engineering.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Swift Kick From A Supernova Could Knock A Black Hole Askew
June 9, 2017
Gravitational waves are providing new hints about how black holes get their kicks. The Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory’s detection of spacetime ripples from two merging black holes on December 26, 2015, indicated that one black hole was spinning like a tilted top as it orbited with its companion. That off-kilter spin could mean that the stellar explosion that produced the black hole gave it a strong kick.
Article: Science News
Synopsis: Physics

Quirky Quarks Could Reveal Details Of The Big Bang
June 9, 2017
A mysterious particle created in a blazing fireball at an atom smasher is misbehaving, a new experiment shows. The particle, called a charm quark, revealed surprising interactions with its neighboring subatomic particles, measurements show. That discovery could improve scientists' understanding of the conditions that existed soon after the Big Bang, when the universe was permeated by a primordial soup of elementary particles, and possibly show hints of physics beyond what scientists know today.
Article: Scientific American
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Physicists Use Quantum Memory To Demonstrate Quantum Secure Direct Communication
June 12, 2017
For the first time, physicists have experimentally demonstrated a quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) protocol combined with quantum memory, which is essential for storing and controlling the transfer of information. Until now, QSDC protocols have used fiber delay lines as a substitute for quantum memory, but the use of quantum memory is necessary for future applications, such as long-distance communication over secure quantum networks.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

How Schrödinger Could Have His Cat And See It Too
June 19, 2017
Schrödinger's cat need not die! In a small but significant way, quantum weirdness just got even weirder — and, as a result, quantum computing may have just moved one step nearer. A team led by Kater Murch from Washington University in St Louis, has found a way to delay — in theory, indefinitely — radioactive atomic decay: the mechanism by which Erwin Schrödinger's famous pet either survived or perished when observed.
Article: Cosmos
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

'Molecules' Of Light Wiggle And Jiggle
June 19, 2017
The first direct observations of how "molecules of light" can vibrate have been made by researchers in France, who have characterized the motions of soliton laser pulses that interact with each other in an optical fibre. Such optical molecules could someday boost the amount of data that can be transmitted along an optical fibre by allowing information to be encoded in the vibrational modes.
Article: Physics World
Synopsis: Physics

Footballers Move Around Pitch Like Chaotic Particles In A Fluid
June 19, 2017
If you've watched any England football games recently, this news might not surprise you. Footballers seem to move across the pitch in much the same manner as particles move in a chaotic flow of fluid.
Article: New Scientist
Abstract: Physical Review Fluids

Where Gravity Is Weak And Naked Singularities Are Verboten
June 20, 2017
Now, new theoretical calculations provide a possible explanation for why naked singularities do not exist — in a particular model universe, at least. The findings indicate that a second, newer conjecture about gravity, if it is true, reinforces Penrose’s cosmic censorship conjecture by preventing naked singularities from forming in this model universe.
Article: Quanta Magazine
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Nuclear fusion: Sustainable energy from plasma hotter than the sun edges closer
June 22, 2017
The prospect of fusion energy — a potentially limitless and clean source of power — has just edged a little closer. Scientists believe they have solved a fundamental problem with building reactors that produce fusion power.
Article: Newsweek
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Magnetic Nanoknots Evoke Lord Kelvin's Vortex Theory Of Atoms
June 23, 2017
In the late 1800s when scientists were still trying to figure out what exactly atoms are, one of the leading theories, proposed by Lord Kelvin, was that atoms are knots of swirling vortices in the aether. Although this idea turned out to be completely wrong, it ushered in modern knot theory, which today is used in various areas of science such as fluid dynamics, the structure of DNA, and the concept of chirality.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Dark-matter Constraints Tightened After LUX No-shows
June 26, 2017
The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) collaboration has set new constraints on hypothetical dark-matter particles called WIMPs — weakly interacting massive particles. The LUX experiment is a dark-matter detector at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in the US. Buried 1500 m under radiation-shielding rock, it consists of a 2 m-tall titanium tank filled with 370 kg of liquid xenon cooled to – 108 °C.
Article: Physics World
Abstract: Physical Review Letters
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

How To Make Topological Plasmons In Graphene
June 26, 2017
Patterned graphene should be an ideal material for creating infrared topological plasmons, according to calculations by physicists in the U.S. and China. Dafei Jin, Thomas Christensen and colleagues at the University of California, Berkeley, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Institute of Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences came to this conclusion after calculating the electronic properties of graphene — a sheet of carbon just one atom thick — patterned with a triangular lattice of circular holes.
Article: Physics World
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

A Study About Nothing
June 29, 2017
A vacuum is a space absolutely devoid of matter, at least according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary. But if you talk to a physicist you may get a different answer. According to quantum physics, even vacuums are not completely empty. Constant fluctuations in energy can spontaneously create mass not just out of thin air, but out of absolutely nothing at all.
Article: Inside Science
Synopsis: Physics

Laser Created By Scientists Can Travel 2 Million Miles Before It Falters
June 30, 2017
A laser with the narrowest frequency spread has been created by scientists, with the light it emits able to travel 2 million miles before it goes out of sync. This breakthrough has widespread applications, and it could be used for high-precision experiments to make atomic clocks more accurate, to collect better radio astronomy data and to test Einstein’s theory of relativity.
Article: Newsweek
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

NEMO-3 Hunts For Ultra-rare Beta Decay
June 30, 2017
For the best part of 30 years, physicists have been looking for a very rare nuclear process known as neutrinoless double beta decay. With discovery still elusive, an international team of researchers led by Pawel Guzowski and colleagues at the University of Manchester have now turned their attention to an even rarer process called neutrinoless quadruple beta decay.
Article: Physics World
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Electrified Droplets Create Mini Saturn Planets
July 7, 2017
By electrifying tiny drops of fluid, scientists have created miniature versions of the ringed planet Saturn. Though gorgeous to look at, the resulting "planet" has more than aesthetic value: The achievement could help lead to new ways of generating microscopic and uniform particles and capsules often used in products such as drugs, inks, cosmetics, paints and ceramics.
Article: Live Science
Synopsis: Physics

Interacting Lasers Shed Light On Topological Defects
July 10, 2017
A new way of using a laser cavity to study the emergence of topological defects has been unveiled by researchers in Israel. Topological defects emerge when a system makes a rapid transition from a disordered to an ordered phase — a process called quenching because it often involves rapid cooling. In the case of magnetic order, quenched magnetic moments form small domains in which the moments point in the same direction.
Article: Physics World
Focus: Physics

What The Heck Is 'Ice VII,' And Why Are Scientists Using Lasers To Make It?
July 11, 29017
Sure, watching ice freeze sounds about as fun as watching paint dry. But that’s just because you haven’t tried making ice with some of the most powerful lasers in the world.
Article: Popular Science
Synopsis: Physics

Quantum-computer Node Uses Two Different Ion Species
July 12, 2017
A node for quantum computing that uses two different species of ion has been unveiled by Chris Monroe and colleagues at the University of Maryland in the US. The system uses a barium ion to communicate externally via light and a ytterbium ion to store quantum information.
Article: Physics World
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Type-II Dirac Fermions Spotted In Two Different Materials
July 13, 2017
The first experimental evidence of a quasiparticle known as a type-II Dirac fermion has been found by three independent research groups — one based in South Korea and two in China. Two of the groups found signs of the quasiparticle in the crystalline material palladium ditelluride.
Article: Physics World
Viewpoint: Physics

Even Ordinary Computer Users Could Access Secret Quantum Computing
July 14, 2017
You may not need a quantum computer of your own to securely use quantum computing in the future. For the first time, researchers have shown how even ordinary classical computer users could remotely access quantum computing resources online while keeping their quantum computations securely hidden from the quantum computer itself.
Article: IEEE Spectrum
Abstract: Physical Review X

Is There Something Special About Our Galaxy's Dark Matter?
July 17, 2017
Astrophysicists offer a possible explanation for why dark matter seems to behave differently in the Milky Way.
Article: Inside Science
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Scientists Find Link Between Vastness Of The Universe, Cosmos' Tiniest Particles
July 19, 2017
The cosmos' tiniest particles and the distribution of matter across the vast universe occupy opposite ends of the scale spectrum, but they're not unrelated. In a new study, published this week in the journal Physical Review Letters, astrophysicists argue the nature of the smallest particles are linked with the vastness of the universe.
Article: UPI
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Surprise! The Proton Is Lighter Than We Thought
July 20, 2017
You can’t weigh the universe’s smallest particles on a bathroom scale. But in a clever new experiment, physicists have found that one such particle — the proton — is lighter than previously thought.
Article: Science Now
Synopsis: Physics

Probability That The Quantum World Obeys Local Realism Is Less Than One In A Billion, Experiment Shows
July 20, 2017
Physicists have reported some of the strongest evidence yet that that the quantum world does not obey local realism by demonstrating new evidence for the existence of quantum entanglement. By performing an essentially loophole-free Bell test, they have shown that two atoms separated by a distance of a quarter of a mile share correlations that should be impossible under the hypothesis of local realism, and are most likely explained by quantum entanglement.
Article: Phys Org
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Pushing Particles Forwards Might Make Them Go Backwards Because Quantum Physics Is Bonkers
July 21, 2017
You are very lucky that you ended up about the size that you are today, somewhere between one and ten feet tall and weighing somewhere between one and one thousand pounds. This is a very good size. Not to body shame, but if you were, say, a quadrillion times shorter and weighed a nonillion times less (that’s one followed by 30 zeros), that would be very inconvenient for you. Everything would be very inconvenient for you.
Article: Gizmodo
Abstract: Physical Review A

Can Four Neutrons Form A Stable Nucleus?
July 24, 2017
Is it possible for four neutrons to bind together to create an uncharged nucleus called a "tetraneutron"? The answer is a qualified "yes", according to physicists in the U.S. and France.
Article: Physics World
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

First Support For A Physics Theory Of Life
July 26, 2017
The biophysicist Jeremy England made waves in 2013 with a new theory that cast the origin of life as an inevitable outcome of thermodynamics. The outcomes of both computer experiments appear to back England’s general thesis, though the implications for real life remain speculative.
Article: Quanta Magazine
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Spinning Black Holes Could Grow Long Hair
July 26, 2017
A potentially explosive phenomenon called superradiance could give black holes hair. The claim relies on the existence of an extremely light particle and could be confirmed by detecting gravitational waves associated with the hair.
Article: Physics World
Viewpoint: Physics

Optical Lens Can Transfer Digital Information Without Loss
July 28, 2017
Researchers have designed an optical lens that exhibits two properties that so far have not been demonstrated together: self-focusing and an optical effect called the Talbot effect that creates repeating patterns of light. The researchers showed that the combination of these two properties can be used to transfer an encoded digital signal without information loss, which has potential applications for realizing highly efficient optical communication systems.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

These Unbelievably Tiny Tags Promise Big Advances In Medical Care
August 1, 2017
Electronics small enough to fit inside cells may one day help scientists track individual cells and monitor their behavior in real time, a new study finds. These new devices could help analyze diseases from their origins in single cells.
Article: NBC News
Synopsis: Physics

Forget Iran And North Korea. Now There's Another Uranium Source
August 5, 2017
Astronomers have proposed that heavy elements in the universe may have been forged when small, primordial black holes swallowed neutron stars. Boffins widely believe that elements lighter than iron are formed during nuclear fusion reactions in the cores of stars, or during supernova bursts. But to create elements heavier than iron, more violent reactions are needed – such as massive supernova explosions or the merger of binary neutron stars.
Article: The Register
Viewpoint: Physics

New Look For Long-neglected Accelerator
August 7, 2017
Smaller, potentially cheaper sources of high-intensity protons could become reality thanks to a novel type of fixed-field alternating-gradient (FFAG) accelerator designed by a physicist in the U.K. FFAGs were first developed in the 1950s but have only recently come to the fore as a result of improved magnet and computing technology.
Article: Physics World
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

How You Board A Plane Affects Your Chances Of Getting Ill Afterwards
August 7, 2017
It's fortunate that the rise of air travel as a popular way of getting around the world has occurred at the same time as a dramatic improvement in human healthcare. While planes are one of the quickest ways for humans to travel, they're also one of the easiest ways for disease to spread around the world.
Article: Tech Radar
Abstract: Physical Review E

Blind Quantum Computing For Everyone
August 11, 2017
For the first time, physicists have demonstrated that clients who possess only classical computers—and no quantum devices—can outsource computing tasks to quantum servers that perform blind quantum computing. "Blind" means the quantum servers do not have full information about the tasks they are computing, which ensures that the clients' computing tasks are kept secure. Until now, all blind quantum computing demonstrations have required that clients have their own quantum devices in order to delegate tasks for blind quantum computing.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Machine Learning Tackles Quantum Error Correction
August 15, 2017
Physicists have applied the ability of machine learning algorithms to learn from experience to one of the biggest challenges currently facing quantum computing: quantum error correction, which is used to design noise-tolerant quantum computing protocols. In a new study, they have demonstrated that a type of neural network called a Boltzmann machine can be trained to model the errors in a quantum computing protocol and then devise and implement the best method for correcting the errors.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Physicists Measure Complementary Properties Using Quantum Clones
August 16, 2017
In quantum mechanics, it's impossible to precisely and simultaneously measure the complementary properties (such as the position and momentum) of a quantum state. Now in a new study, physicists have cloned quantum states and demonstrated that, because the clones are entangled, it's possible to precisely and simultaneously measure the complementary properties of the clones. These measurements, in turn, reveal the state of the input quantum system.
Article: PhysOrg 
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Scientists Discover Why Bubbles Zig-zag As They Rise Through Water
August 17, 2017
Until now, scientists have struggled to explain the zig-zagging motion of air bubbles rising through water. New research suggests patterns can be explained by the bubbles' rotation. Scientists have known of the phenomenon since the 1600s, when Leonard Da Vinci first documented bubbles' nonlinear tendencies. But for four-plus centuries, researchers have failed to explain it.
Article: UPI
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Dynamical Quantum Phase Transitions Seen In Ultracold Ions And Atoms
August 23, 2017
A type of quantum phase transition first predicted in 2013 has been seen by three independent teams of physicists. All three experiments involved systems of interacting ultracold atoms or ions and the observations could lead to a better understanding of the collective behaviour of quantum matter.
Article: Physics World
Viewpoint: Physics

Strange Quantum Physics Idea That Einstein Hated Must Be Integral To Physics
August 25, 2017
The equations of physics are things that we humans created to understand the Universe, and it can be hard to disentangle them from the Universe’s innate properties. It turns out that one of the weirdest things scientists have come up with, what Albert Einstein derisively called “spooky action at a distance,” is more than just math: It’s a fact of reality.
Article: Gizmodo
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Spin Hall Effect Is Measured Directly Using Light
August 31, 2017
Physicists in Switzerland and Sweden say they are the first to use an optical technique to make direct measurements of the spin accumulation associated with the spin Hall effect.
Article: Physics World
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Minuscule Jitters May Hint At Quantum Collapse Mechanism
September 1, 2017
A tiny, shimmying cantilever wiggles a bit more than expected in a new experiment. The excess jiggling of the miniature, diving board–like structure might hint at why the strange rules of quantum mechanics don’t apply in the familiar, “classical” world. But that potential hint is still a long shot: Other sources of vibration are yet to be fully ruled out, so more experiments are needed.
Article: Science News
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Study Finds Molecules Move Faster Near Sticky Surfaces
September 1, 2017
Scientists at the Universite libre de Bruxelles in Belgium have discovered that molecules move faster the closer they get to adhesive surfaces. The study, published Thursday in Physical Review Letters, found that although molecules move faster near adhesive surfaces, the effect does not last forever.
Article: UPI
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Planned Neutrino Detector May Also Reveal Details Of Earth's Interior
September 6, 2017
Construction for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, also known as DUNE, began this July and is scheduled to be completed around 2024. The $1.5 billion facility will be located almost a mile underground, inside the former Homestake gold mine in Lead, South Dakota. Scientists plan to use DUNE to find answers to some of the most important questions in physics today by closely examining the neutrino, one of the most poorly understood fundamental particles.
Article: Inside Science News Service
Synopsis: Physics

Levitating Droplets Go With The Flow
September 7, 2017
Look closely at a cup of coffee or tea and you might see a white mist hovering over the surface. This is thought to be micron-sized droplets of liquid, which physicists know can levitate over the surface of a hot liquid. Sometimes, the levitating droplets can even arrange themselves in a regular 2-D array as they hang in the air.
Article: Physics World
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Drops Of Water Found To Spring From Oscillating Surface Faster Than The Surface Moves
September 11, 2017
A team of researchers with the University of Côte d'Azur in France has found that drops ejected by an oscillating surface can at times travel faster than the surface that ejected them. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the team describes experiments they conducted by flinging water from a superhydrophobic surface and what they found.
Article: PhysOrg
Focus: Physics

Part Of New York's Subway System Found To Conform To Random Matrix Theory
September 12, 2017
A pair of researchers, one with the University of Toronto, the other with the University of California, has found that at least one line on New York City's metro system conforms to random matrix theory. In their paper published in Physical Review E, Aukosh Jagannath and Thomas Trogdon describe their study, which included using statistical theory to analyze the arrival rates of subway cars.
Article: PhysOrg
Synopsis: Physics

Mechanism Could Stop Deadly Spiral Waves In The Heart
September 13, 2017
A mechanism that could break up spiral waves of electrical activity in heart tissue has been identified in simulations done by a team led by Sasha Panfilov at Ghent University in Belgium. Spiral waves can cause irregular heartbeats (arrhythmias) and the team says that the newly discovered mechanism could help stop this potentially deadly condition.
Article: Physics World
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

How To Peel Permanent Marker Off Glass
September 14, 2017
Permanent markers aren’t so permanent after all. All that’s required to peel the ink from glass is the surface tension of water and a little patience, scientists report.
Article: Science News
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Physicists Create Theory Of Self-interacting Dark Matter
September 17, 2017
Just like identical twins, at first glance, two galaxies can often appear to be very similar, identical even. However, upon closer scrutiny, we see that simply isn’t the case. In terms of galaxies, these differences include inner regions that rotate at completely different speeds. So, although they may look the same on the outside, inside is a whole different story.
Article: TrendinTech
Synopsis: Physics

How To Make Half-metals That Contain No Metals
September 18, 2017
A new type of material called a "spin-valley half-metal" has been predicted by calculations done by physicists in Russia, Japan and the U.S. While the material has not yet been characterized in the laboratory, the team says it could find use in new types of biocompatible and carbon-based electronics.
Article: Physics World
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Physicists Guide Electromagnetic Waves Along An Infinitesimal Line
September 18, 2017
Physicists have demonstrated a new mode of electromagnetic wave called a "line wave," which travels along an infinitely thin line along the interface between two adjacent surfaces with different electromagnetic properties. The scientists expect that line waves will be useful for the efficient routing and concentration of electromagnetic energy, with potential applications in areas such as integrated photonics, light-matter interactions, and chiral quantum optics.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Party Trick Breakdown: Why Do Balloons Stick To Hair?
September 20, 2017
Perhaps as a kid you rubbed a balloon really fast against your hair to make it stick. (Maybe you've done it recently!) Now, after many years of speculation, Case Western Reserve University scientists have pinpointed exactly why this party trick happens.
Article: How Stuff Works
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Gravitational Waves May Oscillate, Just Like Neutrinos
September 21, 2017
Using data from the first-ever gravitational waves detected last year, along with a theoretical analysis, physicists have shown that gravitational waves may oscillate between two different forms called "g" and "f"-type gravitational waves.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Scientists Resolve Mysterious Violation To Einstein's Relativity
September 22, 2017
Even if you don’t know much physics, you probably know one of its core tenets: an object at rest stays at rest, and an object in motion stays in motion. Researchers at the University of Glasgow thought of a paradox that would call this basic principle into question. They found instances where moving atoms spitting out packets of light energy would bring into existence a tiny force that acted like friction, and published research on it earlier this year. It turns out that their paradox came from leaving out tiny effects of mass and energy in the atom. And, they say, using only the classical, pre-Einstein laws of physics, they simultaneously killed that frictional force and came up with a new way to derive Einstein’s laws.
Article: Gizmodo
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

VIRGO Bags Its First Gravitational Waves
September 27, 2017
The Virgo observatory in Italy has detected its first gravitational waves just two weeks after the upgraded facility was switched on. The signal came from the merger of two distant black holes and was also seen by the two LIGO detectors in the U.S., which have already detected three black-hole mergers on their own.
Article: Physics World
Article: APS News

Experiment In A Box Suggests A Few Cold Falling Rain Drops Could Lead To A Rain Shower
September 28, 2017
A team of researchers from Germany, France and the U.S. has found a possible explanation for the onset of sudden rainstorms. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes experiments they conducted with stand-ins for water and atmospheric gases in a box in their lab and what they witnessed.
Article: PhysOrg
Focus: Physics

Superconducting Qubits Can Function As Quantum Engines
October 2, 2017
Physicists have shown that superconducting circuits are analogous to piston-like mechanical quantum engines. The new perspective may help researchers design quantum computers and other devices with improved efficiencies.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

X-ray Laser Takes 3-d Images Of Lopsided Viruses
October 5, 2017
Extremely bright and short-lived pulses of X-rays from a free-electron laser have been used to generate 3-D images of virus particles. Unlike existing methods, the technique can be used to identify asymmetries in the structure of biological molecules and could lead to the development of drugs that target molecules whose properties cannot be studied using conventional crystallography.
Article: Physics World
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Experiment Confirms A Crucial Property Of Electrons, Unfortunately
October 10, 2017
When it comes to physics, fewer things are more exciting than proving something wrong. But a team of physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado, Boulder is reporting that, once again, the theory was right—specifically, the Standard Model of particle physics and its prediction of just how spherical the distribution of an electron’s charge really is.
Article: Gizmodo
Viewpoint: Physics

Physicists Solve Extreme Electron Puzzle
October 11, 2017
A better understanding of how electrons behave in extreme conditions will help scientists understand stars, lasers and planets.
Article: Cosmos
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Mpemba Effect Could Occur In Granular Fluids
October 12, 2017
The mystery of why hot water seems to freeze before cold water is one that has long puzzled physicists, who have proposed various mechanisms that could allow for the so-called "Mpemba effect", even though some scientists dismiss it as a myth.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Ultracold Molecules With Electric And Magnetic Moments Stick Around
October 13, 2017
Long-lived, ultracold molecules with both magnetic and electric dipoles have been produced for the first time by researchers in the U.S. The sodium-lithium molecules have much longer lifetimes than ultracold molecules created previously, allowing the researchers to study them more easily. The system also provides fundamental insights into molecular collisions.
Article: Physics World
Viewpoint: Physics

LIGO Detects Fierce Collision Of Neutron Stars For The First Time
October 16, 2017
Scientists announced on Monday that they had seen and heard a pair of dead stars collide, giving them their first glimpse of the violent process by which most of the gold and silver in the universe was created. The collision, known as a kilonova, rattled the galaxy in which it happened 130 million light-years from here in the southern constellation of Hydra, and sent fireworks across the universe.
Article: New York Times
Viewpoint: Physics

Violation Of The Exponential Decay Law Discovered In Open Quantum Systems
October 16, 2017
Ever since the early days of quantum mechanics, the decay dynamics of unstable quantum systems has been thought to follow an exponential decay law, just like the one used to describe radioactive decay and many other natural processes. The exponential law in the quantum domain was originally proposed by George Gamow and later developed by Eugene Wigner and Victor Weisskopf.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Violation Of The Exponential Decay Law Discovered In Open Quantum Systems
October 16, 2017
In a new study, physicists have theoretically shown that quantum decay processes can deviate from the exponential decay law not only when the system is isolated, but even when it is in contact with the external environment. The results suggest that an unstable quantum system can decay and subsequently return to its original state, even in the presence of environmental decoherence.
Article: PhysOrg
Abstract: Physical Review Letters

Atoms And Josephson Junctions Simulate 1-d Quantum Liquid
October 19, 2017
A theory that describes how quantum particles interact with each other in 1-D has been put to the test by two independent teams of physicists. In one experiment, aspects of the Tomonaga–Luttinger theory were verified using laser-trapped ultracold atoms. The other study made use of superconducting devices.
Article: Physics World
Viewpoint: Physics