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APS March Meeting 2018

APS March Meeting 2018
Meeting Schedule

A full schedule of events will be posted this winter.

See our impressive roster of invited speakers.

Schedule at a Glance

 

Premeeting Tutorials & Short Courses

Tutorials
Sunday, March 4, 2018
8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

T1. Density Functional Theory

Who Should Attend

Graduate students, postdocs, and other scientists interested in learning about the essential elements of Density Functional Theory, both in its ground-state and time-dependent formulations. The tutorial talks will be very pedagogical, covering the fundamentals of the theory and a few applications, latest developments, and unsolved questions. This tutorial will be a good introduction for those who are planning to attend the electronic-structure focused sessions at this APS meeting.

Tutorial Description

Density Functional Theory (DFT) provides a practical route for calculating the electronic structure of matter at all levels of aggregation. More than five decades after its inception, it is now routinely used in many fields of research, from materials engineering to drug design. Time-dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) has extended the success of DFT to time-dependent phenomena and excitations. Most applications are carried out in the linear-response regime to describe molecular excitations, but the theory is applicable to a much broader class of problems, including strong-field phenomena, attosecond control of electron dynamics, nanoscale transport, and non-adiabatic dynamics of coupled electron-nuclear systems. The tutorial will provide an introduction to the basic formalism of DFT and TDDFT, an overview of state-of-the-art functionals and applications, and a discussion of the most pressing open questions.

Topics

  • DFT: Basic theorems of ground-state DFT, with simple examples; exchange-correlation functionals and exact conditions such as scaling, self-interaction, and derivative discontinuities; exact exchange and beyond; the Jacob’s ladder of Density Functional approximations.
  • TDDFT: Basic theorems of TDDFT, with simple examples; survey of time-dependent phenomena; memory dependence; linear response and excitation energies; optical processes in materials; multiple and charge-transfer excitations; current-TDDFT; nanoscale transport; strong-field processes; nonadiabatic electron-nuclear dynamics.

Organizers

Adam Wasserman, Purdue University

Instructors

Kieron Burke, University of California at Irvine
Neepa Maitra, Hunter College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York
John Perdew, Temple University
Carsten Ullrich, University of Missouri-Columbia

Fee (per tutorial)

Member: $125
Students: $65

Preregistration Required

T2. Thermoelectrics

Computational and Experimental Approaches to Phonon and Electron Processes in Materials for Thermoelectrics

Who Should Attend

Graduate students, postdocs, and other scientists interested in learning about the exciting new developments in the area of thermoelectric materials. The tutorial talks will be very pedagogical, describing the theoretical foundations and practical approaches. Hands-on components may be incorporated. Topics to be discussed include: (1) electron-phonon effects as they relate to thermoelectric materials, (2) phonon lifetimes – simulation and measurements, (3) accelerated computational screening approaches for identification of new thermoelectric materials, and (4) experimental approaches for synthesis and characterization of new thermoelectric materials.

Tutorial Description

Recent advances in both computation and experiment now offer substantial opportunities for improved understanding of phonon and electron processes relevant to thermoelectric materials. This includes ab- initio approaches applicable to phonon/electron coupling and to phonon lifetimes in materials, computational approaches for high throughput screening and identification of new thermoelectric materials, and state of the art experimental approaches in synthesis and characterization of new materials. This tutorial bridges the gap of introducing foundational concepts underlying thermoelectric energy conversion, descriptions of recent computational advances that now allow us to understand complex physical processes involving phonons and electrons in detail, introducing participants to modern computational software for modeling such processes, and discussing the recent advances in synthesis and characterization that can be used to validate such computational frameworks. The session is of interest to both computational and experimental materials scientists and physicists with interests in the integration of computation and experiment for thermoelectric materials understanding, design, and optimization.

Topics

  • Phonon Electron Coupling: Marco Bernardi (may include hands-on component)
  • Phonon Lifetimes: Lucas Lindsay (may include hands-on component)
  • Computational Screening and Discovery of New Materials for Thermoelectrics: Vladan Stevanovic
  • Experimental Synthesis and Characterization of New Materials for Thermoelectrics: Jeffrey Snyder

Organizers

Elif Ertekin
Eric Toberer

Instructors

Marco Bernardi, California Institute of Technology Lucas Lindsay, Oak Ridge Nat’l Lab G. Jeffrey Snyder, Northwestern Vladan Stevanovic, Colorado School of Mines

Fee (per tutorial)

Member: $125
Students: $65

Preregistration Required

T3. Quantum Spintronics

Who Should Attend

Graduate students, postdocs, and other scientists interested in learning about the exciting new area of quantum spintronics. The tutorial talks will be very pedagogical, describing the theoretical foundations and tools of the field, the techniques for growth and fabrication of quantum spintronic devices, and their optical, magnetic and electronic characterization. Latest developments and open questions will also be prominently featured.

Tutorial Description

Quantum spintronics is an emerging field of spin coherence and spin correlations at or near room temperature, and how they affect a wide range of properties, including spin dynamics and light emission from color centers in solids, spin and charge transport in organic materials, spin-dependent transport in tunnel junctions, dynamic nuclear polarization, and animal sensing of magnetic fields. By relying on roomtemperature spin coherence and spin correlations, room-temperature quantum spintronic systems can be much more sensitive to external perturbations than sensors that must be very near thermal equilibrium. Applications include sensing of magnetic fields in biological systems (e.g. color centers in diamond and other wide-band-gap semiconductors and insulators), control of light emission intensity from organic light emitting diodes (e.g. thermally-activated delayed fluorescence), spin injection, spin dynamics, and coherent optical interactions with single spins (color-center photonics). Highly sensitive room-temperature spin systems also feature prominently in proposals for very low power electronic logic. The tutorial will provide an introduction to the materials and operating regimes that tend to exhibit room-temperature spin coherence and spin correlations, the methods of calculating and measuring these properties, the areas of initial application and the critical open questions in the field.

Topics

  • Theory: Spin dynamics and transport (density matrix and stochastic Liouville equations, master equations), color-center properties (density functional theory, symmetry analyses), ranging from simple (analytic) models and calculations to state of the art numeric.
  • Growth and Fabrication: Organic constituents, diamond and silicon carbide growth and color center control, color-center photonics
  • Characterization: Optical and coherent RF probes of spin dynamics in color centers, organic spin-coherent materials, and photonic devices.

Organizers

Michael E. Flatté, University of Iowa
David D. Awschalom, University of Chicago

Instructors

David D. Awschalom, University of Chicago
Christoph Boehme, University of Utah
Michael E. Flatté, University of Iowa
Evelyn Hu, Harvard University

Fee (per tutorial)

Member: $125
Students: $65

Preregistration Required

T4. Quantum Information and Spacetime

Who Should Attend

Graduate students, post-docs, and other scientists interested in learning about the exciting new area of intersection between Quantum Information, Condensed Matter Physics, and Gravitational Physics. The tutorial talks will be very pedagogical, providing basic overviews of the areas of quantum field theory, holography, quantum information, and complexity used in current research at this interface.

Tutorial Description

This tutorial session will review recent developments connecting quantum information science and quantum condensed matter physics to quantum gravity. For example, quantum information notions of entanglement and entropy are revealing new links between gravity, field theory and quantum mechanics. Such research brings together very different theoretical perspectives, each with its own high level theoretical tools. This tutorial is designed to bridge the gap between these fields, with pedagogical talks that introduce the current theoretical descriptions of quantum gravity and black hole physics, quantum field theory, tensor networks, the holographic principle, and fast scrambling, as well as the essential quantum information concepts and novel tools that are increasingly being used to provide new insights today.

Instructors & Topics

The speakers will be Preskill, Daniel Harlow (MIT), Stephen Shenker (Stanford), and Brian Swingle (U. Maryland). The proposed program of one-hour lectures would be:

  • Preskill: Introduction to relevant concepts, some of which will be treated in more detail by subsequent speakers: black holes and fast scrambling, anti-de Sitter space, holographic correspondence, Ryu-Takayanagi connection between geometry and entanglement, thermofield double, ER=EPR (connection between entanglement and wormholes), tensor networks, computational complexity, quantum error correction.
  • Harlow: Quantum properties of black holes, firewalls, the holographic dictionary as the encoding map of a quantum code, Ryu-Takayanagi as a general property of codes, emergent gauge symmetry in quantum gravity.
  • Shenker: The Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) model and its holographic dual. Chaos and random matrices in quantum gravity.
  • Swingle: Einstein's equations from entanglement, computational complexity and geometry, tensor network approach to holography, experiments probing fast scrambling.

Organizers

John Preskill, Caltech

Fee (per tutorial)

Member: $125
Students: $65

Preregistration Required

Tutorials
Sunday, March 4, 2018
1:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

T5. Hybrid Quantum Systems

Who Should Attend

Graduate students, postdocs and other scientists interested in learning about the exciting new area of hybrid quantum systems. The lectures will provide a pedagogical introduction to hybrid quantum systems, their experimental realization and their novel capabilities with an emphasis on applications to quantum information science, quantum simulation and metrology. Latest developments and open questions will be prominently featured.

Tutorial Description

Recent years have seen the development of a diverse range of mesoscopic quantum systems such as ultracold gases, superconducting qubits, nanomechanical systems and solid-state defect centers. There have been intense efforts to harness these systems for applications to a suite of quantum technologies including sensing, quantum information and communication, and quantum simulation. However, no single system has been shown to be universally optimal for the entire range of envisioned applications. While atomic gases are extremely coherent, they are highly isolated and fragile. While nanoresonators are highly sensitive to small forces and well suited to sensing applications, they suffer from dissipation and loss. While photons are robust carriers of information, they typically exhibit very weak nonlinearities. As such, there is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary effort aimed at ‘hybridizing’ disparate physical systems with complementary functionalities to access new capabilities and phenomena in mesoscopic quantum science. While this new area of ‘hybrid quantum systems’ has been motivated by applications to quantum technologies, there is also a growing appreciation that these systems can also exhibit new forms of quantum behavior that is of interest in tests of macroscopic quantum phenomena or the quantum-to-classical boundary. Reflecting the highly interdisciplinary nature of this new field, the tutorial will feature speakers from diverse backgrounds including AMO physics, condensed matter physics and precision measurement science. The lectures will provide a basic introduction to hybrid quantum systems, their realizations, applications to new regimes of quantum metrology and information processing, with a discussion of open questions and challenges.

Topics

  • Theory : Components of a hybrid system, State preparation and control, Basics of information processing with hybrid quantum systems.
  • Description of archetypal hybrid systems : Ultracold atoms interfaced to cavity optomechanical systems and levitated nanoresonators; Superconducting qubits interfaced to electrons on liquid Helium; Defect centers interfaced to nanophotonic and nanomechanical systems.
  • Experimental techniques for creation, manipulation and control
  • Applications to metrology, information processing and mesoscopic quantum science.

Organizers

Mukund Vengalattore, Cornell University

Instructors

David Schuster, University of Chicago
Andrew Geraci, University of Nevada Reno
Mukund Vengalattore, Cornell University
Peter Rabl, Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology

Fee (per tutorial)

Member: $125
Students: $65

Preregistration Required

T6. Quantum Critical Systems

Who Should Attend

Graduate students, postdocs, and other scientists interested in learning about recent developments in the study of quantum critical phenomena in metallic systems. The tutorial talks are meant to be pedagogical, starting from background and theoretical overview, and ending with recent insights both from theory, from numerical calculations, and from experiments in quantum materials. The basic tools used in the field will be described. Open questions and future research directions will be highlighted.

Tutorial Description

The study of critical phenomena has been a recurring theme in condensed matter physics for many decades. Quantum critical points are continuous transitions that occur at zero temperature. Quantum mechanics entangles the dynamics of the system with its thermodynamics and allows for complex Berry’s phases, making the problem both richer and more fascinating. While quantum critical points in insulating systems are relatively well understood, both theoretically and experimentally, the understanding of quantum criticality in metals remains incomplete. Understanding criticality in metals is particularly pressing, since there is mounting experimental evidence that quantum critical behavior underlies a wide range of phenomena seen in different strongly correlated materials. In particular, it has been suggested that quantum criticality is the key for high temperature superconductivity. However, the problem has proven to be particularly challenging. Recent theoretical developments, both in field theoretic approaches and numerical simulations, as well as new experiments in high temperature superconductors, bring new insights into this long-standing issue.

The tutorial talks will introduce the topic to newcomers, starting from the ground-breaking works of Hertz and Millis, describe some of the experimental facts and theoretical foundation, and discuss the current status of the field, as well as highlighting the main challenges and outstanding mysteries.

Topics

  • Theory: Field-theoretic description of quantum criticality in metals, Hertz-Millis theory and its breakdown, expansion methods, superconductivity near quantum critical points.
  • Experimental facts: Spectroscopic, transport, and thermodynamic experiments in strongly correlated materials suggesting the existence of quantum critical points. Phenomenology of the “Strange Metal” state of the cuprates and its possible quantum critical origin.
  • Recent developments: New expansion techniques introduced to control the theory for different types of critical points; new insights into the quantum critical pairing mechanism; recent experimental evidence for quantum critical behavior and scaling laws in quantum materials; and lessons from sign problem-free quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

Organizers

Erez Berg, University of Chicago

Instructors

Andrey Chubukov, University of Minnesota
Sung-Sik Lee, McMaster University
Yoni Schattner, Stanford University
James Analytis, University of California, Berkeley

Fee (per tutorial)

Member: $125
Students: $65

Preregistration Required

T7. Mathematics

Who Should Attend

Researchers and educators. graduate students, postdocs, university faculty and industry professionals interested in learning how to leverage Mathematica and other Wolfram Technologies effectively in physics research and teaching. Both experienced users as well as those who haven’t used Mathematica yet and want an introduction to and overview of its capabilities relevant to physics and adjacent fields.

Tutorial Description

Wolfram Language and Mathematica have been employed by scientists for nearly 30 years as a "Swiss Army Knife" of scientific computing. This tutorial will cover their uses relevant to physicists, from basic architecture to most recent and advanced features. Among other subjects we will stress symbolic, numeric, and high performance computing, as well as efficient programing techniques, automated physical data access, simulations, analysis, and visualizations. We will walk through applied examples ranging from classical physics to the emerging fields of machine learning and data mining. We also plan to discuss innovative education techniques related to massive open online courses, strategies for modern curriculum development, interactive learning, and intelligent systems helping in classroom.

Topics

Research Applications:

  • Introduction to efficient programming with Wolfram Language
  • Foundations of symbolic and hybrid symbolic-numeric computing
  • Numeric and symbolic calculus including tensors and differential equations
  • Computational geometry with finite elements method applications
  • High performance computing
  • Extracting and analyzing experimental data
  • Machine learning and data mining
  • Hardware and device integration
  • Built-in physical encyclopedic knowledge and data

Educational Applications:

  • Interactive classrooms
  • MOOC and strategies for building modern curriculum
  • Designing interactive applications
  • Interactive digital textbooks and courseware

Organizers

Vitaliy Kaurov, Wolfram Research

Instructors

Craig Carter, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Kyle Keane, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Kevin Daily, Wolfram Research
Vitaliy Kaurov, Wolfram Research

Fee (per tutorial)

Member: $125
Students: $65

Preregistration Required

DPOLY Short Course:
The Gel, Elastomer, and Network Experience (GENE)

DPOLY Short Course Details

The DPOLY short course polymer networks, i.e. gels and elastomers, will provide students with a comprehensive introduction to the fundamental science of these ubiquitous materials as well as an introduction to emerging topics that will rapidly advance their knowledge towards the front of the field.

Saturday, March 3, 2018
1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. (times tentative)

On the first day, the course will cover classic topics in gelation chemistry, structure, elasticity, and dynamic bonding, providing a fundamental introduction to network science at a level substantially deeper than a typical university physics course. The objective of this more fundamental part is to provide an overview of the field and the classical models used to define and describe networks.

Sunday, March 4, 2018
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. (times tentative)

The second day will be dedicated to select advanced topics inspired by recent research findings such as the relationship between network topology and elasticity, how to design molecular simulations of networks, self-assembled gels and liquid crystalline elastomers, and the methods of toughening elastomers and gels. The course will end with lectures from the rubber and biomedical industries, providing a perspective on application-driven needs in network science that will drive the field forward in years to come.

Fees

Member: $225
Students/Postdocs: $150
Nonmembers: $300

Preregistration Required

DBIO Short Course:
Physics Meets Robotics: A Hands-On Locomotion Robophysics

DBIO Short Course Details

Sunday, March 4, 2018
9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Overview

Robots are moving from the factory floor and into our lives (autonomous cars, homecare assistants, search and rescue devices, pets). However, despite the fascinating questions such future “living systems” pose for scientists, the study of such systems has been dominated by engineers and computer scientists. We propose that interaction of researchers studying dynamical systems, soft materials, and living systems can help discover principles which will allow physical robotic devices to interact with the real world in qualitatively different ways than they do now. This short course is designed to actively engage physicists in the challenges of robotics. Short course participants will design and construct small robots, studying how they can self-propel in different environments, and comparing the experiments to a geometric theory of self-propulsion. The short course will take place over a full day and enrollment will be limited to 30 participants; breakfast and snacks/coffee will be provided.

Details

The course will begin the morning with two lectures (Goldman=experiments, Hatton=theory). Goldman will present an overview of locomotion robophysics and experimental techniques, and Hatton will discuss a framework for understanding robot (and animal) locomotion from a differential geometry perspective. Following the lectures, the participants will break into groups of 2-3 and each be given components with which each participant will construct his/her own small (15 cm long) “Purcell” robot (which he/she will get to keep). By the end of the day, under the guidance of Goldman and an assistant, each participant will have built and programmed robot composed of two servo motors, a microcontroller, LEGOs and 3D printed parts. Under the guidance of Hatton and an assistant, each participant will also gain familiarity with open-source software, which enables computation of geometric structures which facilitate prediction of optimal self-propulsion.

Who Should Attend

Students, postdocs, faculty and industrial researchers who are interested in getting some hands-on experience building robots and comparing to theory.

Organizers

Daniel I. Goldman, Georgia Institute of Technology
Ross Hatton, Oregon State University

Fees

Member: $150
Students/Postdocs: $100
Nonmembers: $300

Preregistration Required

GSOFT Short Course:
Machine Learning and Data Science in Soft Matter

GSOFT Short Course Details

Sunday, March 4, 2018
8:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

Data-driven modeling approaches and machine learning have opened new paradigms in the understanding, engineering, and design of soft and biological materials. The advent of high-throughput experimental synthesis and characterization platforms, and the increasing prevalence of high-performance and multicore computer hardware have led to a deluge of data in soft matter. Analysis of these voluminous and multidimensional data sets requires soft matter researchers to implement and adapt tools from machine learning and data science. This one-day workshop will provide emerging and established soft matter researchers with exposure and training in machine learning and data science tools through a series of tutorials from some of the leading experts in the field. Topics to be covered include nonlinear manifold learning, enhanced sampling, materials informatics, and inverse soft materials design. Attendees will leave with both an appreciation for the state-of-the-art applications of data science in soft matter research, and a working knowledge of user-friendly Python libraries to implement these approaches in their own work.

Who Should Attend

This workshop is appropriate for all soft matter physicists who wish to integrate machine-learning tools into their domain-specific expertise. The course is expected to be particularly well-suited to those who have not received formal training in data science tools, but recognize the value of these approaches in advancing their own research endeavors. The workshop is designed to accommodate all levels of attendees from students and post-docs to established faculty members. Computational and experimental researchers are equally welcome.

The “Machine Learning with Python” session is a hands-on workshop. Attendees will bring their own laptop with a working Python installation equipped with the scikit-learn machine-learning library. Canopy and Anaconda provide free and easy-to-install Python releases equipped with scikit-learn and numerous other scientific libraries. Instructions are available online.

Organizers

Andrew Ferguson, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Eric Jankowski, Boise State University

Fees

Member: $150
Students/Postdocs: $100
Nonmembers: $300

Preregistration Required