APS March Meeting 2017

Tutorials

Tutorials are half-day workshops held on the Sunday before the opening of the March Meeting organized by March Meeting Program Chairs. There are four morning and four afternoon tutorials. See complete information about each tutorial, including content description and speakers, below.
 

Morning Tutorials
Tutorial #1
Tutorial #2
Tutorial #3
Tutorial #4
Afternoon Tutorials
Tutorial #5
Tutorial #6
Tutorial #7
Tutorial #8

Registration Fees

  • Meeting Attendees: $125 per tutorial
  • Students: $65 per tutorial

Registration Information

  • Register for tutorials when you register for the meeting
  • Register early! Space is limited and tutorials will fill up
  • Register now or onsite at the New Orleans Convention Center

Gray Arrow Register Now

Tutorial #1: Quantum Photonics

Quantum photonics is one of the most active and rapidly-developing fields in physical sciences and engineering. It draws techniques and ideas from several disciplines such as (quantum) optics,semiconductor/nano materials and devices, nanophotonics/plasmonics and atomic physics to study and control light-matter interaction and light emission in diverse systems ranging from semiconductor nanostructures, metamaterials, graphene and 2D materials, nanowires, quantum dots, color and defect centers (e.g., diamond NV centers) to atoms/molecules/ions etc. Quantum photonics has become a significant part of the contemporary optical/photonic and quantum science and technologies. It has enabled important new directions and applications in quantum information science such as quantum communication and computing, quantum sensing and metrology, optoelectronics, spintronics, cavity QED and optomechanics, and the study of novel states of matter (such as Bose-Einstein condensates of exciton polaritons) and even foundations of quantum physics. The tutorial will provide an introduction to the fundamentals and current frontiers of quantum photonics and its applications.

Topics

  • Introduction to quantum optics and quantum photonics, including the key concepts and theoretical and experimental techniques
  • Physical systems studied in quantum photonics, such as low dimensional semiconductor structures, 2D materials, NV centers, cold atoms and hybrid systems that interfaces or combines multiple different systems
  • Interfacing nanophotonics, metamaterials and plasmonics with quantum photonics
  • Applications and connections to other fields

Instructors

  • Darrick Chang, ICFO
  • Javier Garcia de Abajo, ICFO-Spain
  • Mikhail Lukin, Harvard University
  • Vlad Shalaev, Purdue University

When?
Sunday, March 12, 2017
8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Where?
Room 292

Who Should Attend?
Graduate students, post-docs, and other scientists interested in learning about the fundamentals and key new developments in quantum photonics. The tutorial talks will be pedagogical, covering the experimental and theoretical foundations of the field, the physical properties, material/device issues,newest developments, potential applications and open questions associated with a variety of quantum photonic platforms based on solid state/nano systems as well hybrid systems interfacing solid state/nano photonic systems with atomic systems or atom-like objects.

Organizer
Yong P. Chen, Purdue University

Tutorial #2: Electron Phonon Interactions

Recent advances in the theoretical description and computational methodology have made harmonic and an-harmonic electron-phonon effects amenable to detailed investigations. While the underlying techniques are currently not standard and are oftentimes computationally expensive, the availability of modern high- performance computing enabled fantastic progress, e.g. for electron-phonon effects on band structures, optical absorption, recombination, and transport. In the near future it is expected that not only will the existing techniques be improved, but also become crucial for progress in many areas of materials research and condensed matter physics. This step requires that a broad base of scientists is familiar with theoretical concepts and their implementation into first-principles codes. This tutorial bridges the gap of introducing the underlying theories, explaining practical calculations using modern software packages, and understanding exciting physics for real-world applications. The latter comprises studies of material systems e.g. in the realm of semiconductor optics or thermoelectrics. The tutorial will be interesting for computational materials scientists and physicists who contemplate investigating electron-phonon effects in their research but also for experimentalists who want to connect closer with computational materials science.

Topics

  • Electronic and optical properties: Band structures, Optical-absorption spectra, Zero-point vibrations, Phonon frequencies, Dielectric screening, Non-radiative recombination

  • Electron transport: Polarons and mobility
  • Real-time dynamics: Energy exchange between electrons and ions, non-adiabatic effects

Instructors

  • Feliciano Giustino, Oxford University

  • Chris G. Van de Walle, University of California, Santa Barbara

  • Carsten Ullrich, University of Missouri

  • Mark van Schilfgaarde, King’s College

When?
Sunday, March 12, 2017
8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Where?
Room 289

Who Should Attend?
This tutorial aims at graduate students, post-docs, and other scientists interested in learning about first-principles numerical techniques to describe electron-phonon interactions. The tutorial talks will be very pedagogical in describing the theoretical foundations as well as practical approaches used to describe (1) electron-phonon effects on optical properties, (2) polarons, non-radiative recombination, and mobility, (3) Green’s function methods and the effect of electron-phonon coupling on dielectric screening, and (4) real-time time-dependent DFT as a complementary technique used to study electron-phonon effects. Latest developments and open questions will naturally be integrated into all topics.

Organizer
Emmanouil Kioupakis and André Schleife

Tutorial #3: Topological Insulators

Topological insulators are band insulators with topologically nontrivial quantum ground states. The study about these novel states of matter has improved our understanding of the quantum world. In addition, concepts and ideas developed from these studies have also been benefiting research activities in other subareas of physics and materials science. For example, on the experimental side, these topological states are characterized by a gapped insulating bulk and topologically-protected metallic surfaces with spin-momentum locking. These novel surface states offer a new platform for the study of 2D charge/spin transport and can be used to create new electronic devices, e.g., topological spintronics. One other interesting extension about topological insulators lies in strong-correlation effects. In strongly-correlated materials, topologically-nontrivial insulating states can also be stabilized, where interactions play an essential role and strong correlation effects arise naturally. Furthermore, studies on topological insulators have also motivated physicists to explore other topological states beyond insulators, e.g., topological superconductors and topological semi-metals, which will also be discussed in this tutorial.

This tutorial will provide an introduction about basic ideas and tools for the study of topological states of matter, including theory, experiments, and materials synthesis. The lectures will discuss fundamental questions about topological insulators, as well as its interplay with other subfields of condensed matter physics, including strongly-correlated topological insulators, topological spintronics, topological semi-metals, etc.

Topics

  • Theory and Concepts: topological insulators
  • Materials Synthesis: growth and fabrication
  • Characterization: charge transport, spin transport, etc.
  • Beyond: strongly-correlated topological states, topological spintronics, topological semi-metals, etc.

Instructors

  • B. Andrei Bernevig, Princeton University
  • Piers Coleman, Rutgers University
  • Çagliyan Kurdak, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Nitin Samarth, Penn State University

When?
Sunday, March 12, 2017
8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Where?
Room 293

Who Should Attend?
Graduate students, post-docs, and scientists interested in learning about topological insulators and related topological states of matter, as well as their interplay with other subfields of condensed matter physics. The tutorial discusses both basic concepts and recent progress in experiments and theoretical studies. The lectures will be pedagogical, describing theoretical foundations and experimental techniques, including materials synthesis, charge transport, spin transport, topological spintronics, etc.

Organizer
Kai Sun, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Tutorial #4: Current Research in Many-Body Localization

This tutorial aims to explore the manifestations of quantum mechanics in highly excited many-body systems in the many-body localized regime. Localization research dates back nearly 60 years in the context of semiconductor transport, but interest in the interacting (many-body) problem has exploded recently due to a combination of new theoretical insights, the availability of large scale computer simulations and the development of well-isolated experimental many-body quantum systems, including ion traps, superconducting qubit arrays and ultracold atomic gases. Many-body localized systems violate the ergodic hypothesis which underlies all of equilibrium statistical mechanics and thus present a profound challenge to our theoretical and experimental understanding. Its implications are far-reaching and only just now being uncovered: for example, many-body localized systems exhibit quenched transport, slow growth of entanglement and novel non-equilibrium phases and phase transitions forbidden by statistical mechanics. These phenomena may also have applications in both solid-state quantum computing and adiabatic quantum optimization.

The field has moved very rapidly in the last several years and this tutorial aims to introduce interested scientists to both the foundational questions and the latest experimental, numerical and theoretical developments.

Topics

  • Theory: Foundations of isolated system dynamics and localization, evidence for existence of MBL phase, eigenstate structure, entanglement structure and dynamics, MBL protected quantum orders, phenomenological descriptions (l-bits, etc), periodic driving (Floquet MBL), the localization phase transition and the role of baths
  • Techniques: Survey of analytic and numerical techniques ranging from perturbation theory and series expansions to diagonalization techniques and excited state DMRG
  • Experiments: Survey of recent results (ion traps, superconducting qubits, etc) with a focus on ultracold atomic experiments

Instructors

  • Vadim Oganesyan, City University of New York, New York
  • Sarang Gopalakrishnan, City University of New York, New York
  • David Luitz, Technical University of Munich, Germany
  • Ulrich Schneider, Cambridge University, Cambridge

When?
Sunday, March 12, 2017
8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Where?
Room 290

Who Should Attend?
Graduate students, post-docs, and other scientists interested in learning about emerging research in many-body localization (MBL). The tutorial talks will be pedagogical, describing the theoretical foundations of the field, the state of the art in numerical studies and the exciting recent experimental progress. Latest developments and open questions will be prominently featured.

Organizer
Chris R. Laumann, Boston University, Boston

Tutorial #5: Weyl Semi-metals

The discovery of Topological Insulators a decade ago led to an explosive growth of interest in the electronic structure topology and its observable consequences. The most recent development in this field is the realization that not only insulators, but also gapless semimetals and even metals may be topologically nontrivial in much the same sense as insulators. This not only significantly extends the list of candidate topologically-nontrivial materials, but also introduces a number of fundamentally new observable phenomena, as not only the surface, but also the bulk may exhibit nontrivial response in metallic and semimetallic materials. This tutorial will provide a pedagogical introduction to Topological Semimetals, covering both the theoretical foundations and the most recent developments on the theoretical and experimental fronts.

Topics

  • General introduction to Weyl and Dirac semimetals, Fermi arcs
  • Type-II vs Type-I Weyl semimetals and novel fermions "beyond Weyl and Dirac"
  • Introduction to transport phenomena and response in Weyl semimetals
  • Chiral anomaly and its manifestations in Weyl and Dirac semimetals

Instructors

  • Andrei Bernevig, Princeton University
  • Anton Burkov, University of Waterloo
  • Nai Phuan Ong, Princeton University
  • Siddharth Parameswaran, University of California at Irvine

When?
Sunday, March 12, 2017
1:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Where?
Room 293

Who Should Attend?
Anyone interested in learning about the exciting new field of Topological (Weyl, Dirac, and beyond) Semimetals. Graduate students, postdocs and early career scientists in general are particularly encouraged to attend.

Organizers
Anton Burkov, University of Waterloo

Tutorial #6: Computation in the undergraduate curriculum

The Partnership for Integration of Computation into Undergraduate Physics (PICUP) seeks to expand the role of computation in the undergraduate physics curriculum. Its projects facilitate the integration of computation by helping faculty transform their own course materials. In this tutorial we will discuss the importance of integrating computation into the physics curriculum and guide participants in discussing and planning how they would integrate computation into their courses. The PICUP partnership has developed materials for a variety of physics courses in a variety of platforms including C/C++, Fortran, Python/Jupyter Notebooks, Octave/MATLAB, and Mathematica. Participants will receive information on the computational materials that have been developed, ways to tailor the materials to their own classes, and available faculty opportunities and support through the PICUP partnership. Please bring a laptop computer with the software of your choice.

Topics

  • The PICUP framework for integrating computation
  • Discussion of ways of integrating computation, along with benefits and challenges of integrating computation
  • Showcase of available materials, including time to explore and try those materials

Instructors

  • Danny Caballero (caballero@pa.msu.edu), Michigan State University
  • Norman Chonacky (norman.chonacky@yale.edu), Yale University
  • Larry P. Engelhardt (LEngelhardt@fmarion.edu), Francis Marion University
  • Robert Hilborn (rhilborn@aapt.org), American Association of Physics Teachers
  • Marie Lopez del Puerto (mlpuerto@stthomas.edu), University of St. Thomas
  • Kelly Roos (rooster@fsmail.bradley.edu), Bradley University

When?
Sunday, March 12, 2017
1:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Where?
Room 290

Who Should Attend?

  • Faculty, graduate students, and post­docs who teach undergraduate physics courses and are interested in integrating computation into those courses either as part of lecture, as homework, as part of a laboratory, or as student projects
  • Graduate students and post­docs who are interested in teaching and would like to learn about ways of integrating computation into teaching

Organizer
Prof. Marie Lopez del Puerto, University of St. Thomas

Tutorial #7: Topological Physics with Cold Atoms

In recent years, cold atoms have emerged as a new platform for studying topological physics. While drawing inspiration from remarkable phenomena discovered in solid-state systems, such as the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects, cold-atom experiments offer complementary features and pose distinct challenges. Key features include the availability of bosons as well as fermions, tunability of interactions, and flexibility for optically trapping atoms in diverse lattice geometries. A primary challenge is that neutral atoms experience no Lorentz force in a magnetic field, so that alternative methods are required to break time-reversal symmetry or induce spin-orbit coupling.

The tutorial will cover methods of generating synthetic magnetic fields and spin-orbit coupling for neutral atoms and review realizations of paradigmatic topological models such as the Harper-Hofstadter Hamiltonian, the Haldane model for a quantum Hall effect without Landau levels, and the Thouless charge pump. We will introduce the cold-atom toolbox for probing topological bands in optical lattices, which has enabled direct measurements of Berry curvature and Chern numbers (topological invariants), as well as in situ observations of chiral edge states. Prospects for investigating topologically ordered states, e.g., Majorana fermions in topological superfluids, will also be discussed.

Topics

  • Basic concepts of topological physics
  • Synthetic magnetic fields and spin-orbit coupling in bulk and lattice systems
  • Probing topology in cold-atom experiments: real-space vs. momentum-space techniques; transport measurements, interferometry, and spin-resolved imaging
  • Implementations of paradigmatic models with ultracold bosons and fermions
  • Routes to topologically ordered many-body states
  • Dynamical topological phase transitions

Instructors

  • Wolfgang Ketterle, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Ian Spielman, National Institute of Standards and Technology
  • Christof Weitenberg, University of Hamburg
  • Hui Zhai, Tsinghua University

When?
Sunday, March 12, 2017
1:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Where?
Room 292

Who Should Attend?
Graduate students, post-docs, and faculty interested in learning about the state of the art and prospects in the rapidly developing field of topological physics with cold atoms. The tutorial will provide both theoretical background and a survey of experimental techniques. Participants with a background in condensed-matter physics will be introduced to the unique capabilities of cold-atom systems, while basic concepts of topological physics will also be introduced for those without prior background in condensed-matter theory.

Organizer
Monika Schleier-Smith, Stanford University

Tutorial #8: Active Matter

Active Matter refers to a novel class of nonequilibrium materials composed of many interacting units that individually consume energy and collectively generate motion or mechanical stresses. Active systems span an enormous range of length scales, from the cytoskeleton of individual living cells, to tissues and organisms, to animal groups such as bird flocks, fish schools and insect swarms. These disparate systems exhibit a number of common mesoscopic to large-scale phenomena, including swarming, non-equilibrium disorder-order transitions, mesoscopic patterns, anomalous fluctuations and surprising mechanical properties. Experiments in this field are now developing at a rapid pace and new theoretical ideas are needed to identify "universal" behavior in this broad class of internally driven systems. The soft-matter community anticipates that this field will keep growing at a rapid pace in the near future. There are very few forums in which junior researchers can learn the physical principles needed to embark on research in active matter. We are proposing this tutorial to fill that gap.

The tutorial will consist of a set of inter-connected lectures on key phenomena, experimental techniques, simulation methods, descriptive frameworks, and theoretical approaches.

Topics

  • Agent-based flocking models and their continuum field-theory counterparts
  • Low-Reynolds- number swimming and pattern formation in bacterial suspensions
  • Active liquid-crystal hydrodynamics as a generic theoretical framework capable of unifying diverse systems such as collections of swimmers and the cell cytoskeleton
  • Cell spreading, motility and division
  • The mechanical regulation of tissue growth

Instructors

Theory & Simulations:

  • Aparna Baskaran, Brandeis University
  • Julien Tailleur, Université Paris Diderot-CNRS
  • Yaouen Fily, Brandeis University

Experimentalist:

  • Dan Needleman, Harvard University

When?
Sunday, March 12, 2017
1:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Where?
Room 289

Who Should Attend?
Graduate students, post-docs, and university faculty, who are interested in a broad introduction to the current state of basic and applied research in the emerging field of Active Matter. Junior scientists and established researchers will gain insight into the open questions and key techniques used is active matter research.

Organizers

  • Bulbul Chakraborty, Dept. of Physics, Brandeis University
  • M. Cristina Marchetti, Dept. of Physics, Syracuse University